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One of the essential elements of the health and safety management system is hazard identification. It is the foundation for developing safe work procedures, establishing prevention programs and making other precautions to eliminate or control the hazards.  

A hazard is any source of potential damage, harm or adverse health effects on something or someone. Risk is the chance that a hazard will cause harm.  Hazard identification process involves identifying both existing and potential workplace hazards, assessing the risks, determining and implementing the controls, and reviewing hazards.  

Employers have the legal responsibility to identify and control, to the best of their ability, workplace hazards in order to protect workers. Likewise, workers have the right to know about the hazards of the job and how to protect themselves, and the responsibility to follow company rules that outline the hazard control processes. It is the responsibility of all workers to understand what a hazard is, what the risk is, how the hazards can affect people, property, and the environment, and how to prevent injury or illness from that hazard.

When to identify hazards?
 
There are formal hazard assessments involving all workers before commencing work. Documentation from this should be reviewed as conditions change. There are informal hazard assessments that are ongoing and often undocumented, which consists of continuously scanning surroundings to be aware of condition changes.
It is an on-going process. You can identify hazards:

  • During design and implementation
    • Designing new process
    • Purchasing and installing new machinery
  • Before tasks are done
    • Using new equipment or processes
    • Each shift in hazardous environments
  • During work
    • Be aware of changes, abnormal conditions, or sudden emissions
  • After incidents
    • Near misses or minor events
    • Injuries

Employer responsibilities

An employer has many responsibilities for hazard control under the legislation. These responsibilities include but are not limited to the following:

  • Identify, assess, and properly control workplace hazards.
  • Prepare a current list of known hazards in the workplace, including chemical and biological substances, physical agents, work design hazards, and any other risks.
  • Maintain hazard identification and control lists as part of the health and safety management system.
  • Develop written safe work practices and procedures.
  • Inform workers about the hazards in the workplace.
  • Train workers with regard to hazard assessment and required control measures to keep them safe at work.  and
  • Ensure that an emergency response plan is developed for hazardous tasks.

While the current Saskatchewan legislation does not explicitly outline the steps for a hazard identification process, following these steps will help you accomplish the requirement:

  • Identify hazards
  • Assess the risk of the identified hazards using a risk assessment methodology
  • Determine the appropriate controls
  • Implement controls to address identified hazards, focusing on hazards with the greatest risk first, and considering:
    • hierarchy of controls:
      • elimination/substitution, engineering, administrative (including safe work practices/procedures and training), personal protective equipment (PPE)
      • at the source, along the path, at the worker
    • regulatory and other established standards
  • Follow up on hazard controls to ensure they:
    • have been implemented as intended
    • are effective, and
    • have not created new hazards
  • Keep any documets or records that may be necessary. Documentation may include detailing the process used to assess the risk, outlining any evaluations, or detailing how conclusions were made.


Activities that are considered to be High Hazard Work include
:

  • Building construction
  • Drilling for gas, oil and minerals
  • Service for gas and oil wells and power tong service
  • Logging
  • Sawmilling
  • Iron and steel processing and fabrication
  • Road construction, earthwork, tunnelling and trenching
  • Local and provincial hauling and trucking
  • Mining and smelting
  • Exploration drilling, shaft sinking, quarrying and crushing of rocks
  • Manufacturing of concrete block, brick, artificial stone and other clay and cement products
  • Power line construction and maintenance.

It is important to check the regulations to determine if the activities that are being carried out by your employees have hazard identification requirements.

Specific hazards or risks that the employer must address as per the Occupational Health and Safety Regulations, include:

  • Musculoskeletal injuries
  • Shift work
  • Visually demanding tasks
  • Exposure to infectious material or organism
  • Full body harness
  • Storage of materials
  • Vehicular traffic
  • Powered Mobile Equipment
  • Transparent materials used in cabs
  • Hoist crane, lifting device, or rigging
  • Hazardous confined space
  • Asbestos waste
  • Garbage and flammable liquids
  • Hot work 
  • Cutting and skidding
  • Cutting trees
  • Bucking and limbing
  • Cathead or tong lines of rig
  • Firefighting vehicles and equipment

Supervisor responsibilities

For areas under their direction, supervisors must ensure the safety of the workers they supervise.
Supervisors must:

  • Identify all potential hazards and risks to workers in their work areas.
  • Develop and implement measures to eliminate, reduce, or control the identified risks.
  • Develop procedures on how to respond to an emergency for a hazardous task.
  • Train workers about these hazards and the implemented control strategies.
  • Include hazard identification and control strategies as part of the new worker orientation process.
  • Ensure worker compliance with safe work practices and procedures.

Worker responsibilities

Workers must:

  • Follow the safe work practices and procedures that comply with the regulatory requirements.
  • Inspect the workplace, the equipment, machines, devices and personal protective equipment as required by the employer’s health and safety management system and manufacturer’s recommendations. , and
  • Participate in identification of unsafe conditions and practices and report them to the employer and/or committee or representative. and
  • Work with his or her supervisor to resolve unsafe conditions and practices.

Occupational Health Committee or Representative must:

  • Assist the employer and supervisor to identify, assess, and control hazards.
  • Monitor the effectiveness of the implemented controls.
  • Establish, promote and recommend the means of delivery of health and safety management systems for the education and information of workers regarding identified workplace hazards.

 

SASKATCHEWAN EMPLOYMENT ACT
S.S. 2013, c. S-15.1

Part III OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY

Section 3-10 General duties of workers

3-10. Every worker while at work shall:

(a) take reasonable care to protect his or her health and safety and the health and safety of other workers who may be affected by his or her acts or omissions;

(b) refrain from causing or participating in the harassment of another worker;

(c) cooperate with any other person exercising a duty imposed by this Part or the regulations made pursuant to this Part; and

(d) comply with this Part and the regulations made pursuant to this Part.

Section 3-16 Duty to provide information

3-16. (1) In this section, "required information":

(a) means any information that an employer, contractor, owner or supplier knows or may reasonably be expected to know and that:

(i) may affect the health or safety of any person who works at a place of employment; or

(ii) is necessary to identify and control any existing or potential hazards with respect to any plant or any process, procedure, biological substance or chemical substance used at a place of employment; and

(b) includes any prescribed information.

(2) Subject to section 3-17 and Division 7, every employer shall keep readily available all required information and provide that information to the following at a place of employment:

(a) the occupational health committee;

(b) the occupational health and safety representative;

(c) the workers, if there is no occupational health committee and no occupational health and safety representative.

(3) Subject to Division 7, every contractor shall provide all required information to:

(a) every employer and self-employed person with whom the contractor has a contract; and

(b) any occupational health committee established by the contractor.

(4) Subject to Division 7, every owner of a plant used as a place of employment shall provide all required information to every contractor, every employer who employs workers who work in or on the plant and every self-employed person who works in or on the plant.

(5) Subject to Division 7, every supplier shall provide prescribed written instructions and any other prescribed information to every employer to whom the supplier supplies any prescribed biological substance, chemical substance or plant.

Occupational Health and Safety Regulations, 1996
S.S., c. O-1.1, Reg 1

Part IX Safeguards, Storage, Warning Signs and Signals

Section 129 Storage of materials

129. An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that:

(a) no material or equipment is placed, stacked or stored so as to constitute a hazard to workers; and

(b) stacked materials or containers are stabilized, if necessary, by interlocking, strapping or other effective means of restraint.

Section 133 Risk from vehicular traffic

133. (1) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a worker who is at risk from vehicular traffic, whether on a public highway or at any other place of employment, is provided with and required to use a high visibility vest, armlets or other high visibility clothing.

(2) Where there is a danger to a worker from vehicular traffic on a public highway, an employer or contractor shall develop and implement a traffic control plan, in writing, to protect the worker from traffic hazards by the use of one or more of the following:

(a) warning signs;

(b) barriers;

(c) lane control devices;

(d) flashing lights;

(e) flares;

(f) conspicuously identified pilot vehicles;

(g) automatic or remote-controlled traffic control systems;

(h) designated signallers directing traffic.

(3) An employer or contractor shall ensure that:

(a) workers are trained in the traffic control plan developed pursuant to subsection (2); and

(b) the traffic control plan developed pursuant to subsection (2) is made readily available for reference by workers at the place of employment.

(4) An employer or contractor shall use designated signallers to control traffic on a public highway only where other methods of traffic control are not adequate or suitable.

(5) Where designated signallers are used to control traffic on a public highway, an employer or contractor shall provide:

(a) at least one designated signaller if:

(i) traffic approaches from one direction only; or

(ii) traffic approaches from both directions and the designated signaller and the operator of an approaching vehicle would be clearly visible to one another; and

(b) at least two designated signallers if traffic approaches from both directions and the designated signaller and the operator of an approaching vehicle would not be clearly visible to one another.

(6) Where there is or may be a hazard to a worker from traffic at a place of employment other than a public highway, an employer or contractor shall develop and implement a traffic control plan to protect the worker from traffic hazards.

(7) A traffic control plan required by subsection (6) must:

(a) be in writing;

(b) be made readily available for reference by workers at the place of employment; and

(c) set out, where appropriate:

(i) the maximum allowable speed of any vehicle or class of vehicles, including powered mobile equipment, in use at the place of employment;

(ii) the maximum operating grades;

(iii) the location and type of control signs;

(iv) the route to be taken by vehicles or powered mobile equipment;

(v) the priority to be established for classes of vehicle;

(vi) the location and type of barriers or restricted areas; and

(vii) the duties of workers and the employer or contractor.

(8) A worker who operates a vehicle or unit of powered mobile equipment at a place of employment and who does not have a clear view of the path to be travelled shall not proceed until a person who has a clear view of the path to be travelled by the vehicle or unit of powered mobile equipment signals to the worker that it is safe to proceed.

(9) Where a provision of this section conflicts with a provision of The Highway Traffic Act, The Highways and Transportation Act, The Vehicle Administration Act, a regulation made pursuant to any of those Acts or a bylaw of a municipality made pursuant to The Urban Municipality Act, 1984, The Rural Municipality Act, 1989 or The Northern Municipalities Act, the provision of the other statute, regulation or bylaw prevails.

(10) Nothing in this section applies to a peace officer in the performance of the peace officer's duties.

Part III General Duties

Section 12 General duties of employers

12. The duties of an employer at a place of employment include:

(a) the provision and maintenance of plant, systems of work and working environments that ensure, as far as is reasonably practicable, the health, safety and welfare at work of the employer's workers;

(b) arrangements for the use, handling, storage and transport of articles and substances in a manner that protects the health and safety of workers;

(c) the provision of any information, instruction, training and supervision that is necessary to protect the health and safety of workers at work; and

(d) the provision and maintenance of a safe means of entrance to and exit from the place of employment and all worksites and work-related areas in or on the place of employment.

Section 13 General duties of workers

13. A worker shall:

(a) use the safeguards, safety appliances and personal protective equipment provided in accordance with these regulations and any other regulations made pursuant to the Act; and

(b) follow the safe work practices and procedures required by or developed pursuant to these regulations and any other regulations made pursuant to the Act.

Section 19 Training of workers

19. (1) An employer shall ensure that a worker is trained in all matters that are necessary to protect the health and safety of the worker when the worker:

(a) begins work at a place of employment; or

(b) is moved from one work activity or worksite to another that differs with respect to hazards, facilities or procedures.

(2) The training required by subsection (1) must include:

(a) procedures to be taken in the event of a fire or other emergency;

(b) the location of first aid facilities;

(c) identification of prohibited or restricted areas;

(d) precautions to be taken for the protection of the worker from physical, chemical or biological hazards;

(e) any procedures, plans, policies and programs that the employer is required to develop pursuant to the Act or any regulations made pursuant to the Act that apply to the worker's work at the place of employment; and

(f) any other matters that are necessary to ensure the health and safety of the worker while the worker is at work.

(3) An employer shall ensure that the time spent by a worker in the training required by subsection (1) is credited to the worker as time at work, and that the worker does not lose pay or other benefits with respect to that time.

(4) An employer shall ensure that no worker is permitted to perform work unless the worker:

(a) has been trained, and has sufficient experience, to perform the work safely and in compliance with the Act and the regulations; or

(b) is under close and competent supervision.

Section 22 Occupational health and safety program

22. (1) Subject to subsection (2), an occupational health and safety program required bysection 13 of the Act must include:

(a) a statement of the employer's policy with respect to the protection and maintenance of the health and safety of the workers;

(b) the identification of existing and potential risks to the health or safety of workers at the place of employment and the measures, including procedures to respond to an emergency, that will be taken to reduce, eliminate or control those risks;

(c) the identification of internal and external resources, including personnel and equipment, that may be required to respond to an emergency;

(d) a statement of the responsibilities of the employer, the supervisors and the workers;

(e) a schedule for the regular inspection of the place of employment and of work processes and procedures;

(f) a plan for the control of any biological or chemical substance handled, used, stored, produced or disposed of at the place of employment and, where appropriate, the monitoring of the work environment;

(g) a plan for training workers and supervisors in safe work practices and procedures, including any procedures, plans, policies or programs that the employer is required to develop pursuant to the Act or any regulations made pursuant to the Act that apply to the work of the workers and supervisors;

(h) a procedure for the investigation of accidents, dangerous occurrences and refusals to work pursuant to section 23 of the Act at the place of employment;

(i) a strategy for worker participation in occupational health and safety activities, including audit inspections and investigations of accidents, dangerous occurrences and refusals to work pursuant tosection 23 of the Act ; and

(j) a procedure to review and, where necessary, revise the occupational health and safety program at specified intervals that are not greater than three years and whenever there is a change of circumstances that may affect the health or safety of workers.

(2) On and after January 1, 1998, the places of employment set out in Table 7 of the Appendix with 10 or more workers are prescribed for the purposes ofsection 13 of the Act .

(3) An employer at a place of employment mentioned in subsection (2) shall establish an occupational health and safety program that meets the requirements of subsection (1) not later than:

(a) in a place of employment with 100 or more workers, January 1, 1998;

(b) in a place of employment with 21 or more workers but not more than 99 workers, January 1, 1999; and

(c) in a place of employment with 10 or more workers but not more than 20 workers, January 1, 2000.

Part XI Powered Mobile Equipment

Section 156 Inspection and maintenance

156. An employer or contractor shall ensure that:

(a) all powered mobile equipment is inspected by a competent person for defects and unsafe conditions as often as is necessary to ensure that it is capable of safe operation;

(b) where a defect or unsafe condition that may create a hazard to a worker is identified in the powered mobile equipment:

(i) steps are taken immediately to protect the health and safety of any worker who may be at risk until the defect is repaired or the unsafe condition is corrected; and

(ii) as soon as is reasonably practicable, the defect is repaired or the unsafe condition is corrected; and

(c) a written record of the inspections and maintenance carried out pursuant to clauses (a) and (b) is kept at the place of employment and made readily available to the operator.

Section 162 Transparent materials used in cabs, etc.

162. (1) An employer, contractor or supplier shall ensure that any transparent material used as part of the enclosure for a cab, canopy or roll-over protective structure on powered mobile equipment is made of safety glass or another material that gives at least equivalent protection against shattering.

(2) An employer, contractor or supplier shall ensure that any defective glass or other transparent material in a cab, canopy or roll-over protective structure that creates or may create a hazard is removed and replaced.

Part XIII Hoists, Cranes and Lifting Devices

Section 216 Inspections

216. (1) An employer, contractor or supplier shall ensure that a hoist, crane or lifting device is inspected by a competent person to determine whether the hoist, crane or lifting device is in safe working condition:

(a) before the hoist, crane or lifting device is used at the start of each work shift; and

(b) at regular intervals as recommended by the manufacturer.

(2) Where a defect or unsafe condition that may create a hazard to a worker is found in a hoist, crane, lifting device or rigging, an employer, contractor or supplier shall:

(a) take steps immediately to protect the health and safety of any worker who may be at risk until the defect is repaired or the unsafe condition is corrected; and

(b) as soon as is reasonably practicable, repair any defect or correct any unsafe condition.

(3) An employer, contractor or supplier shall ensure that a mobile crane is subjected to a thorough inspection, including non-destructive testing, under the supervision of a professional engineer every two years or 1,800 hours of operation, whichever comes first.

(4) An employer, contractor or supplier shall ensure that a tower crane is subjected to a thorough inspection, including non-destructive testing, under the supervision of a professional engineer:

(a) before erection at each site; and

(b) at subsequent intervals of 2,000 operating hours or one year, whichever occurs first.

(5) No worker shall operate a crane or cause a crane to be operated unless a copy of the results of the testing or inspection required by subsection (3) or (4) is readily available or is on site.

Part XVIII Confined Space Entry

Section 273 Purging and ventilating of unsafe atmosphere

273. (1) In addition to the requirements of section 369, where a concentration of a toxic, flammable or explosive substance is present or an oxygen enrichment or deficiency exists in a hazardous confined space, an employer shall ensure that the hazardous confined space is:

(a) purged and ventilated before a worker is allowed to enter the space, so that:

(i) any hazard associated with a toxic, flammable or explosive substance is reduced to the extent that is possible or eliminated; and

(ii) an oxygen content of not less than 19.5% and not more than 23% is ensured; and

(b) continuously ventilated at all times during which the worker occupies the hazardous confined space, to maintain a safe atmosphere.

(2) Where ventilation is used to reduce or eliminate a hazard pursuant to subsection (1), an employer shall ensure that a competent person tests the atmosphere to determine that the confined space is safe for entry by a worker:

(a) before a worker enters the confined space;

(b) where all workers have vacated the confined space, before any worker re-enters the confined space;

(c) on the request of a worker who is required or permitted to enter the confined space; and

(d) continuously where any condition in the confined space may change and put the worker's health or safety at risk.

Part XXIII Asbestos

Section 341 Asbestos waste

341. (1) Subject to subsection (3), an employer or contractor shall ensure that asbestos waste or dust produced in a place of employment is cleaned away promptly, and at least once each day, by vacuum cleaning equipment equipped with a HEPA filter to prevent the escape of asbestos dust into the air or, where vacuum cleaning is not practicable, by wet methods.

(2) An employer or contractor shall ensure that the vacuum cleaning equipment mentioned in subsection (1):

(a) is inspected regularly for defects;

(b) is maintained; and

(c) is certified by a competent person at least once each year as being able to function safely and effectively.

(3) Subsection (1) does not apply to vacuum cleaning equipment used within an effectively isolated enclosure that is being used to control the release of asbestos dust.

(4) An employer or contractor shall ensure that workers who are employed in the disposal of asbestos wastes are adequately trained in the safe means of handling those wastes and the proper disposal of those wastes in a manner that will not create a hazard to the health or safety of workers at the disposal site.

Part XXV Fire and Explosion Hazards

Section 362 Garbage as fire hazard

362. Where garbage that may constitute a fire hazard is present at a place of employment, an employer, contractor or owner shall provide covered receptacles for the garbage that are suitable to the nature of the hazard.

Section 364 Receptacles for materials contaminated by flammable liquids

364. (1) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that materials contaminated by flammable liquids are placed in receptacles that:

(a) are non-combustible and have close-fitting metal covers;

(b) are labelled "flammable"; and

(c) are located at least one metre away from other flammable liquids.

(2) Where the surface on which a receptacle required by subsection (1) is placed is combustible, an employer shall ensure that the receptacle has a flanged bottom or legs that are not less than 50 millimetres high.

(3) A worker shall place materials contaminated by flammable liquids and garbage that may constitute a fire hazard into the appropriate receptacle required by this section or by section 362.

Section 370 Hot work

370. (1) Where a flammable substance is or may be present, an employer or contractor shall ensure that no hot work is performed until:

(a) suitable tests have been conducted that:

(i) indicate whether the atmosphere contains a flammable substance in a quantity sufficient to create an explosive atmosphere; and

(ii) confirm that the work may be safely performed; and

(b) the work procedures developed pursuant to clause 363(1)(b) have been implemented to ensure continuous safe performance of the work.

(2) While hot work is being performed, an employer or contractor shall conduct tests described in clause (1)(a) at intervals appropriate to the work being performed and record the results.

(3) An employer or contractor shall not require or permit any hot work to be performed in the vicinity of a material that may constitute a fire hazard until suitable steps have been taken to reduce the risk of fire.

(4) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a container or piping that contains or has contained a flammable substance is purged using an effective method to remove the flammable substance from the container or piping before any hot work is begun on that container or piping.

(5) An employer or contractor shall not require or permit any welding or cutting of metal that has been cleaned with a flammable or combustible liquid until the metal has thoroughly dried.

Part XXVIII Forestry and Mill Operations

Section 392 Cutting and skidding -- general requirements

392. (1) During cutting and skidding operations, an employer or contractor shall ensure that:

(a) workers who do not have duties associated with cutting and skidding are not permitted to enter the area where those operations are carried out while they are being carried out;

(b) a worker fells all timber that is adjacent to a proposed landing or other place where workers will work and that may create a hazard to workers before the landing or other place is used;

(c) no worker fells a tree within range of a travelled road unless effective means are taken to stop traffic until the tree has been felled and the tree and all debris that creates a risk to the health or safety of a worker have been removed from the road; and

(d) a worker closely limbs trees:

(i) before the trees are placed on a rollway; or

(ii) where the limbs may create a risk to the health or safety of a worker.

(2) An employer or contractor shall ensure that:

(a) no person enters a felling area unless the worker engaged in felling has advised the person entering the area that it is safe to enter;

(b) workers are instructed in, and comply with, the duties set out in subsection (3), subsection 146(4), sections 393 and 394, subsections 395(3), 397(3) and 398(2), section 400 and subsection 401(11);

(c) every worker engaged in conventional logging has, within six months after commencing employment, successfully completed an approved course in conventional logging safety; and

(d) a worker who has completed an approved course as required by clause (c) maintains any designation or certification that is earned through completing that course.

(3) A worker shall not work on a hillside below a cutting or skidding operation where a danger may exist from a tree or log rolling or moving downhill towards the worker.

[Sask. Reg. 67/2007, s. 29]

Section 393 Cutting

393. During cutting operations, a worker shall:

(a) remove any chicot or any other hazard to the worker or any other worker in the vicinity before any other tree is felled;

(b) remain at a safe distance from, and not fell a tree onto, any tree that is lodged or may be dangerous for any other reason; and

(c) move quickly to a predetermined safe position when a tree starts to fall.

Section 398 Bucking and limbing

398. (1) Where a worker is bucking or limbing, an employer or contractor shall ensure that the worker:

(a) clears away any brush or object that may create a hazard to the worker;

(b) does not move forward while limbing a tree or log unless the worker is limbing on the side of the tree or log that is opposite to the side of the tree or log on which the worker is located;

(c) remains at least 60 metres from any tree being felled;

(d) remains in a location safe from any tree or log being skidded or otherwise moved; and

(e) works only on the uphill side of any log that is lying on an incline.

(2) While bucking or limbing, a worker:

(a) shall clear away any brush or object that may create a hazard to the worker;

(b) shall not move forward while limbing a tree or log unless the worker is limbing on the side of the tree or log that is opposite to the side of the tree or log on which the worker is located;

(c) shall remain at least 60 metres from any tree being felled;

(d) shall remain in a location safe from any tree or log being skidded or otherwise moved; and

(e) shall work only on the uphill side of any log that is lying on an incline.

Part XXIX Oil and Gas

Section 412 Supervisors

412. (1) An employer, contractor or owner shall appoint a competent person to supervise any oil or gas exploration, drilling, servicing, testing or production operation.

(2) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that the supervisor appointed pursuant to subsection (1) is knowledgeable about, and experienced in the following matters that are within the area of the supervisor's responsibility:

(a) safe work practices, including the safe operation of any plant at the place of employment;

(b) the safe handling, use and storage of hazardous substances;

(c) well control and blowout prevention;

(d) the detection and control of worker exposure to hydrogen sulphide;

(e) the handling, use, maintenance and storage of personal protective equipment;

(f) the appropriate response to any emergency situation at the place of employment;

(g) the duties and responsibilities of all workers being supervised by the supervisor;

(h) the training of workers being supervised by the supervisor in safe work practices and procedures.

(3) An employer, contractor or owner who has appointed a supervisor pursuant to subsection (1) shall:

(a) give written notice to all employers and self-employed persons who are involved in the operation of the name, method of contact, duties and responsibilities of the supervisor; and

(b) obtain written acknowledgement from each employer or self- employed person involved in the operation that the employer or self-employed person has received the notice required by clause (a) and has agreed to accept the direction of the supervisor.

Section 417 Securing parts of rig

417. (1) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that any part of a rig, and any equipment attached to a rig, that may endanger a worker if it fails, moves or falls is secured to eliminate the danger.

(2) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that the driller's position on a rig is protected from any hazard created by the cathead or tong lines.

(3) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that the workers on a drilling rig floor are protected from any hazard created by the cathead or tong lines.

Part XXXII Additional Protection for Fire Fighters

Section 485 Inspection of firefighting vehicles and equipment

485. An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that:

(a) all firefighting vehicles and firefighting equipment are inspected by a competent person for defects and unsafe conditions as often as is necessary to ensure that the vehicles and equipment are capable of safe operation;

(b) where a defect or unsafe condition that may create a hazard to a fire fighter is identified in a firefighting vehicle or firefighting equipment:

(i) steps are taken immediately to protect the health and safety of any fire fighter who may be at risk until the defect is repaired or the unsafe condition is corrected; and

(ii) as soon as is reasonably practicable, the defect is repaired or the unsafe condition is corrected; and

(c) a written record:

(i) is kept of all inspections carried out pursuant to clause (a);

(ii) is signed by the competent person who performs the inspection; and

(iii) is kept at the place of employment and is made readily available to the committee, the representative and the fire fighters.

Part XXXIII Repeal, Transitional and Coming into Force

Schedule Table 8 Activities that Constitute High Hazard Work

[Clause 50(d)]

Building construction

Drilling for gas, oil and minerals

Service for gas and oil wells and power tong service

Logging

Sawmilling

Iron and steel processing and fabrication

Road construction, earthwork, tunnelling and trenching

Local and provincial hauling and trucking

Mining and smelting

Exploration drilling, shaft sinking, quarrying and crushing of rocks

Manufacturing of concrete block, brick, artificial stone and other clay and cement products

Power line construction and maintenance.

Part VI General Health Requirements

Section 81 Musculoskeletal injuries

81. (1) In this section, "musculoskeletal injury" means an injury or disorder of the muscles, tendons, ligaments, nerves, joints, bones or supporting vasculature that may be caused or aggravated by any of the following:

(a) repetitive motions;

(b) forceful exertions;

(c) vibration;

(d) mechanical compression;

(e) sustained or awkward postures;

(f) limitations on motion or action;

(g) other ergonomic stressors.

(2) An employer or contractor, in consultation with the committee, shall regularly review the activities at the place of employment that may cause or aggravate musculoskeletal injuries.

(3) Where a risk of musculoskeletal injury is identified, an employer or contractor shall:

(a) inform each worker who may be at risk of developing musculoskeletal injury of that risk and of the signs and common symptoms of any musculoskeletal injury associated with that worker's work; and

(b) provide effective protection for each worker who may be at risk, which may include any of the following:

(i) providing equipment that is designed, constructed, positioned and maintained to reduce the harmful effects of an activity;

(ii) implementing appropriate work practices and procedures to reduce the harmful effects of an activity;

(iii) implementing work schedules that incorporate rest and recovery periods, changes in workload or other arrangements for alternating work to reduce the harmful effects of an activity.

(4) An employer or contractor shall ensure that workers who may be at risk of developing musculoskeletal injury are instructed in the safe performance of the worker's work, including the use of appropriate work practices and procedures, equipment and personal protective equipment.

(5) Where a worker has symptoms of musculoskeletal injury, an employer or contractor shall:

(a) advise the worker to consult a physician or a health care professional who is registered or licensed pursuant to an Act to practise any of the healing arts; and

(b) promptly review the activities of that worker and of other workers doing similar tasks to identify any cause of the symptoms and to take corrective measures to avoid further injuries.

Section 82 Shift work and constant effort and exertion

82. Where a worker works shifts or a worker's work demands constant and uninterrupted mental effort or constant and uninterrupted physical exertion, an employer or contractor, in consultation with the committee, shall:

(a) assess the risks to the worker's health and safety of the worker's work; and

(b) inform the worker of the nature and extent of the risks mentioned in clause (a) and the ways to eliminate or reduce those risks.

Section 83 Visually demanding tasks

83. (1) An employer or contractor, in consultation with the committee, shall identify any tasks that involve a potentially harmful visual demand on a worker.

(2) An employer or contractor:

(a) shall take all practicable steps to reduce the harmful visual demand of those tasks;

(b) shall inform the worker of the risk of performing those tasks;

(c) shall advise the worker to consult a physician or an optometrist if any persistent vision impairment, disability or visual strain results from performing the tasks;

(d) where a worker cannot attend a consultation mentioned in clause (c) during the worker's time off work, shall permit the worker to attend the consultation during normal working hours without loss of pay or other benefits; and

(e) where a worker cannot recover the costs of a consultation mentioned in clause (c), shall reimburse the worker for the costs of the consultation that, in the opinion of the director, are reasonable.

Section 85 Exposure control plan

85. (1) In this section:

(a) "engineering controls" means physical controls or barriers that isolate or remove an infectious disease hazard and includes:

(i) medical devices approved by Health Canada that have engineered sharps injury protections;

(ii) sharps disposal containers;

(iii) needleless systems and needles with engineered sharps injury protections as defined in section 474.1; and

(iv) other devices that isolate or remove sharps hazards;

(b) "expose" means harmful contact with an infectious material or organism from inhalation, ingestion, skin or mucous membrane contact or percutaneous injury;

(c) "exposure control plan" means an exposure control plan required pursuant to subsection (2);

(d) "infectious material or organism" means an infectious material or organism that has been identified in an approved manner as an infectious disease hazard that poses a significantly increased exposure risk to a worker or self-employed person.

(2) If workers are required to handle, use or produce an infectious material or organism or are likely to be exposed at a place of employment, an employer, in consultation with the committee, shall develop and implement an exposure control plan to eliminate or minimize worker exposure.

(3) An exposure control plan must:

(a) be in writing;

(b) identify any workers at the place of employment who may be exposed;

(c) identify categories of tasks and procedures that may put workers at risk of exposure;

(d) describe the ways in which an infectious material or organism can enter the body of a worker and the risks associated with that entry;

(e) describe the signs and symptoms of any disease that may arise for a worker exposed at the place of employment;

(f) describe infection control measures to be used, such as the following:

(i) vaccination;

(ii) engineering controls;

(iii) personal protective equipment;

(iv) safe work practices and procedures; and

(v) standard practices that incorporate universal precautions;

(g) identify the limitations of the infection control measures described pursuant to clause (f);

(h) set out procedures to be followed in each of the following circumstances:

(i) if there has been a spill or leak of an infectious material or organism;

(ii) if a worker has been exposed;

(iii) if a worker believes that he or she has been exposed;

(i) set out the methods of cleaning, disinfecting or disposing of clothing, personal protective equipment or other equipment contaminated with an infectious material or organism that must be followed and indicate who is responsible for carrying out those activities;

(j) describe the training to be provided to workers who may be exposed and the means by which this training will be provided;

(k) require the investigation and documentation, in a manner that protects the confidentiality of the exposed worker, of any work-related exposure incident, including the route of exposure and the circumstances in which the exposure occurred; and

(l) require the investigation of any occurrence of an occupationally transmitted infection or infectious disease to identify the route of exposure and implement measures to prevent further infection.

(4) If subsection 85(2) applies to an employer on the day on which this section comes into force or at any time before January 1, 2006, that employer must, no later than January 1, 2006, describe in his or her exposure control plan the steps that will be taken by July 1, 2006 to ensure compliance with this section and, if applicable, subsection 474.1(3).

(5) No employer shall allow a worker to undertake any tasks or procedures mentioned in clause (3)(c) unless the worker has been trained with respect to the exposure control plan and the use of control measures appropriate for the task or procedure undertaken.

(6) An employer, in consultation with the committee, shall review the adequacy of the exposure control plan, and amend the plan if necessary, at least every two years or as necessary to reflect advances in infection control measures, including engineering controls.

(7) An employer shall make a copy of the exposure control plan and any amendments to that plan readily available to every worker who may be exposed. (8) An employer shall:

(a) inform workers who are required to handle, use or produce an infectious material or organism or who may be exposed at a place of employment:

(i) of any vaccine recommended for workers with respect to that risk in the Canadian Immunization Guide, published by Health Canada, and recommended by:

(A) a medical health officer appointed pursuant to The Public Health Act or a designated public health officer within the meaning of The Public Health Act, 1994 whose powers and responsibilities include those set out in Part IV of The Public Health Act, 1994; or

(B) a physician with expertise in immunization or the control of communicable diseases; and

(ii) of the risks associated with taking a vaccine mentioned in subclause (i);

(b) with the worker's consent, arrange for the worker to receive any vaccination recommended pursuant to subclause (a)(i) during the worker's normal working hours and reimburse the worker for any costs associated with receiving the vaccination; and

(c) if a worker cannot receive a vaccination mentioned in subclause (a)(i) during the worker's normal working hours, credit the worker's attendance for the vaccination as time at work and ensure that the worker does not lose any pay or other benefits.

(9) If a worker has been exposed to blood or potentially infectious bodily fluids at a place of employment, an employer shall, with the consent of the worker, during the worker's normal working hours, arrange for immediate medical evaluation and intervention by a qualified person in an approved manner and for confidential post-exposure counselling.

(10) If a worker cannot receive medical evaluation, medical intervention or post-exposure counselling during the worker's normal working hours, an employer shall credit the worker's attendance for evaluation, intervention or counselling as time at work and shall ensure that the worker does not lose any pay or other benefits.

(11) Nothing in these regulations prohibits an employer or contractor from purchasing supplies in bulk together with another employer or contractor but each employer or contractor is responsible for ensuring his or her compliance with these regulations.

[Sask. Reg. 6/97, s. 5; 112/2005, s. 4]

Part VII Personal Protective Equipment

Section 87 General responsibilities

87. (1) Where an employer or contractor is required by these regulations or any other regulations made pursuant to the Act to provide personal protective equipment, the employer or contractor shall:

(a) supply approved personal protective equipment to the workers at no cost to the workers;

(b) ensure that the personal protective equipment is used by the workers;

(c) ensure that the personal protective equipment is at the worksite before work begins;

(d) ensure that the personal protective equipment is stored in a clean, secure location that is readily accessible to workers;

(e) ensure that each worker is aware of the location of the personal protective equipment and trained in its use;

(f) inform the workers of the reasons why the personal protective equipment is required to be used and of the limitations of its protection; and

(g) ensure that personal protective equipment provided to a worker:

(i) is suitable and adequate and a proper fit for that worker;

(ii) is maintained and kept in a sanitary condition; and

(iii) is removed from use or service when damaged.

(2) Where an employer or contractor requires a worker to clean and maintain personal protective equipment, the employer shall ensure that the worker has adequate time during normal working hours without loss of pay or other benefits for this purpose.

(3) Where reasonably practicable, an employer or contractor shall make appropriate adjustments to the work procedures and the rate of work to eliminate or reduce the danger or discomfort to the worker that may arise from the worker's use of personal protective equipment.

(4) A worker who is provided with personal protective equipment by an employer or contractor shall:

(a) use the personal protective equipment; and

(b) take reasonable steps to prevent damage to the personal protective equipment.

(5) Where personal protective equipment provided to a worker becomes defective or otherwise fails to provide the protection it was intended for, the worker shall:

(a) return the personal protective equipment to the employer or contractor; and

(b) inform the employer or contractor of the defect or other reason why the personal protective equipment does not provide the protection that it was intended to provide.

(6) An employer or contractor shall immediately repair or replace any personal protective equipment returned to the employer or contractor pursuant to clause (5)(a).

Section 106 Workers' responsibilities re lifelines, etc.

106. (1) Before using a lifeline or lanyard, a worker shall ensure that the lifeline or lanyard:

(a) is free of imperfections, knots and splices, other than end terminations;

(b) is protected by padding where the lifeline or lanyard passes over sharp edges; and

(c) is protected from heat, flame or abrasive or corrosive materials during use.

(2) Before using a vertical lifeline, a worker shall ensure that:

(a) the lower end extends to the ground or to a safe landing; and

(b) the lifeline is protected at the lower end to ensure that the line cannot be fouled by any equipment.

(3) Before using a full-body harness, a worker shall ensure that the full-body harness:

(a) is properly adjusted to fit the worker securely; and

(b) subject to subsection 274(5), is attached by means of a connecting linkage to a fixed anchor or a lifeline.

(4) A worker who uses a full-body harness and connecting linkage shall ensure that the connecting linkage is attached to a personal fall arrest system, lifeline or a fixed anchor.

[Sask. Reg. 67/2007, s. 9]

Section 107 Inspection of full body harness, etc.

107. (1) Where the use of a connecting linkage, personal fall arrest system, full-body harness or lifeline is required by these regulations, an employer or contractor shall ensure that a competent person:

(a) inspects the connecting linkage, personal fall arrest system, full-body harness or lifeline:

(i) as recommended by the manufacturer; and

(ii) after the connecting linkage, personal fall arrest system, full-body harness or lifeline has sustained a fall-arresting incident; and

(b) determines whether the connecting linkage, personal fall arrest system, full-body harness or lifeline is safe for continued use.

(2) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a worker inspects the connecting linkage, personal fall arrest system, full-body harness or lifeline before each use and that where a defect or unsafe condition that may create a hazard to a worker is identified in a connecting linkage, personal fall arrest system, full-body harness or lifeline:

(a) steps are taken immediately to protect the health and safety of any worker who may be at risk until the defect is repaired or the unsafe condition is corrected; and

(b) as soon as is reasonably practicable, the defect is repaired or the unsafe condition is corrected.

[Sask. Reg. 67/2007, s. 10]

Mines Regulations, 2003
R.R.S., c. O-1, r. 2

Part V General Safety Requirements

Section 28 Regular inspection of underground mine

28. (1) An employer or contractor must prepare a written plan for regular inspections of an underground mine that:

(a) identifies the parts of the mine to be inspected; and

(b) subject to subsection (2), specifies the frequency of inspection for each part of the mine to be inspected, taking into account:

(i) the work to be done in the mine;

(ii) the conditions arising in the mine; and

(iii) the requirements of these regulations.

(2) Inspections must be made at least once during each shift in any underground part of the mine where:

(a) mining is taking place;

(b) drilling or blasting is taking place; or

(c) a worker is working alone.

(3) An employer or contractor must:

(a) appoint a competent person to implement the plan for inspection of a mine;

(b) ensure that the person appointed pursuant to clause (a) records each inspection carried out; and

(c) ensure that any condition relevant to the health or safety of workers on succeeding shifts is recorded in the shift record.

Section 29 Inspection of equipment and worksite

29. An employer must ensure that each worker inspects his or her worksite and equipment for defects and unsafe conditions at the beginning of each shift, and as necessary after that, to ensure that the worksite and equipment are safe.