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Personal protective equipment (PPE) controls the hazard at the worker. It is the last barrier between the hazard and the worker because it protects the worker from the hazard without eliminating it. PPE must be used when other controls such as plant and process design, engineering and administrative controls do not eliminate or minimize the hazard at an acceptable level.  Since PPE does not eliminate the hazard, PPE should not be the only form of hazard control, unless it is an emergency situation. There is a wide range of PPE available to choose from. Before requiring a worker to use certain protection equipment, the employer or contractor must conduct a hazard assessment and identify what the right protection is to protect a worker from the hazard.

To adequately protect the worker, the PPE must be:

  • appropriate for the hazard,
  • fitted to the worker,
  • maintained in good condition,
  • used as recommended by the manufacturer, and
  • enforced where needed.

The Saskatchewan legislation requires employers and contractors to:

  • inform the workers where, when, and why they are required to use PPE and what are its limitations;
  • provide workers with appropriate and properly fitted PPE at no cost (excluding non-specialized footwear);
  • train the workers in the use, care, maintenance, and limitations of the PPE;
  • make sure that the PPE is at the worksite before the work starts;
  • make certain that the workers understand the information received, are aware of the location of the equipment, and that they use the equipment;
  • make sure that the equipment is maintained and kept in sanitary condition;
  • make sure that the workers have the necessary time during the work hours to properly clean and maintain their PPE;
  • replace or repair the defective PPE in a timely manner; and
  • make alternative work arrangements where the PPE does not effectively protect the worker.

Workers provided with PPE must:

  • Inspect/test the PPE before each use;
  • Use the PPE;
  • Care for the PPE so that damage is prevented;
  • Report to the employer or contractor any defect or malfunction of the PPE; and
  • Return the defective PPE to employer or contractor.

Respiratory protection

Respiratory protective equipment must be worn by workers likely to be exposed to dust, fumes, gas, mist, aerosol, vapour, or any airborne contaminants present in the air in amounts which may be offensive or harmful to the worker.

The employer and contractor must make sure that:

  • The respiratory protective device:
    • is appropriate for the contaminants the worker is exposed to;
    • is fit-tested by a competent person;
    • effectively seals to the skin of the worker when a tight fit is required; and
    • is cared for maintained and kept, when not in use, protected against contamination and damage due to extreme temperature.
  • The respiratory protection devices used in emergency situations are inspected monthly, according to the manufacturer’s specifications, and after each use by a competent person.
  • The competent person inspecting respiratory devices used in emergencies:
    • records the date of the inspection and his/her name; and
    • immediately corrects the defects identified during the inspection.
  • Atmosphere-supplying respirators, that meet the requirements of the regulations, are provided where a worker is required to work in an atmosphere that is immediately dangerous to the life and health (IDLH) of the worker.
  • A worker working in an IDLH atmosphere is, at all times, assisted by and in communication with a second worker suitably equipped and trained.
  • Emergency response personnel are trained and readily available to rescue a worker whose respirator fails while working in an IDLH atmosphere.
  • The compressed air supplied to the respirator of a worker working in IDLH conditions meets the purity requirements set out in Table 2 of the Canadian Standards Association standard CAN3-Z180.1-M85 Compressed Breathing Air and Systems.
  • Workers who are required to use a respiratory protection device:
    • Are trained by a competent person in the testing, use, maintenance, care, and limitations of the equipment.
    • Can demonstrate that they know how to test, use, maintain and care for the device.
    • Are assessed as being capable of wearing a respiratory protective device.
  • Workers who use respiratory protective devices only in emergency situations are given semi-annual refresher training in its safe use.
  • The following records are maintained and made available for inspection and examination by the Occupational Health Committee as long as the worker is employed by the employer:
    • fit-testing records,
    • results of worker’s assessment of fitness to wear a respirator,
    • training records, and
    • records of maintenance of the atmosphere-supplying respirators.

Head protection

Industrial protective headwear must be provided by employers and contractors, and must be worn by workers where there is a risk of injury to the head.

The following places and operations are deemed to expose workers to head injury risks:

  • mines, mills or smelters,
  • forestry or sawmilling operations,
  • construction sites,
  • drilling operations, and
  • oil or gas servicing operations.

As an employer or contractor you must:

  • Provide approved industrial protective headwear that is appropriate to the job the worker is doing.
  • Provide a suitable liner to protect the worker from cold.
  • Provide a retention system to secure the headwear on the head where the conditions of the work may cause the headwear to dislodge.
  • NOT permit the worker to use headwear that was damaged, modified, subjected to severe impact, or was painted or cleaned with solvents.
  • Make sure that workers using all-terrain vehicles, snowmobiles and towed conveyances, which are not equipped with roll-over protection and enclosed by a cab, use protective headgear and eye or face protector.
  • Make sure all-terrain vehicles, snowmobiles and towed conveyances that have roll-over protection have seat-belts, and the seat-belts are used by the workers.

Eye and face protection

Eye and face protection must be worn where there is a risk of injury to eyes or face due to:

  • flying objects or particles
  • splashing liquids
  • molten material
  • ultraviolet (UV), visible, or infrared radiation

An employer or contractor has the duty to:

  • Provide approved industrial eye and face protection, and require the worker to use it.
  • Protect workers working in the vicinity of a welding area by providing eye protectors or a screen that protects the workers from the radiation.

Welders must not weld when co-workers are in the area and they are not protected from radiation by suitable eye protection or by a screen.

Skin protection

Employer and contractors must provide protective clothing, and require the workers to use them when there is the risk of injury to the skin. The protective clothing must be adequate to the nature of the hazard to which the worker is exposed to, including:

Lower body protection

The employer must make sure that a worker at risk of cut, puncture, irritation or abrasion to the lower part of the body wears appropriate safety pants or chaps.

Foot protection

Employers and contractors must ensure that workers wear footwear appropriate to the risks associated with occupation and workplace.

Workers involved in the operations where there is the risk of the foot being crushed by heavy loads or punctured by sharp objects must wear crushing and/or puncture-resistant footwear. Workers working in the following places are considered to be at risk of foot crushing or puncturing:

  • mines, mills or smelters,
  • forestry or sawmilling operations,
  • construction sites,
  • drilling operations, and
  • oil or gas servicing operations.

The employer or contractor must provide:

  • Outer foot guards where there is a substantial risk of crushing injury to the foot.
  • Protective footwear resistant to hot, corrosive, or toxic substances where the worker may come into contact with such substances.

The employer, in consultation with the committee, worker representative, or workers (if there is no committee or representative), may permit the use and impose any conditions appropriate on the use of soft-soled footwear without puncture-proof plates in the sole for:

  • Workers who are competent steel erectors engaged in the connection of structural components of a skeletal structure.
  • Competent workers who are engaged in the installation of a roof.

Hand and arm protection

An employer or contractor must provide appropriate hand and arm protection when these body parts are at risk of injury from:

Body protection when working with hazardous chemicals

Where workers are exposed to hazardous substances, the employer or contractor must provide, and require the workers to use, adequate:

  • protective clothing,
  • hand protection, and
  • eye or face protection.

Hearing protection

An employer or contractor must provide, and require the worker to use, a hearing protector where it is not practicable to reduce the worker’s exposure to noise below 85 dBA Lex or the noise level below 90 dBA.

The employer and contractor must make sure that:

  • Where practicable, the hearing protector reduces the level of noise received by the worker’s ear at less than 85 dBA.
  • Where not practicable to reduce the level of noise received by the worker’s ear at less than 85 dBA, the hearing protector reduces the noise at the lowest practicable level.
  • A competent person fits the hearing protector if its effectiveness depends on the close approximation of the size or shape of the worker’s auditory canal.

Fall protection

Fall protection equipment must be used by workers who are at risk of:

  • Falling three meters or more;
  • Experiencing an injury if falling less than 3 metres; or
  • Drowning and are not protected from guardrails.

Personal fall arrest systems must be used when:

  • Working on a work platform which is part of a slip form used in a building shaft.
  • Working on suspended powered scaffolds.
  • Working on aerial devices and elevating work platforms. 
  • Working from a work platform mounted on a forklift.
  • On personnel lifting units raised by cranes and hoists.
  • Climbing fixed ladders more than 6 metres high.
  • Accessing a hazardous confined space from the top.

An employer or contractor must:

  • Provide fall protection equipment adequate for the job.
  • Train the workers who are required to use a full-body harness in its safe use and maintenance.
  • Provide a lifeline for each worker who is required to have a lifeline and to use a personal fall arrest system.
  • Make sure that:
    • The lifeline meets the regulatory requirements, is securely fastened on an anchor point, and is maintained as per the manufacturer’s instructions.
    • Where a lifeline is used, its lower end extends to the ground or to a safe landing, and it is protected against damages due to other equipment.
    • The fall arrest system and connecting linkage is approved, and meets the regulatory requirements.
    • The full-body harness is fitted to the worker, is approved, meets the regulatory requirements, and is maintained in good condition.
    • Snaps and hooks used with the personal fall arrest system are self-locking, approved and maintained.
    • Lanyards are as short as conditions permit, are equipped with snap hooks, and are maintained in good condition.
    • The personal fall arrest system, connecting linkage, full-body harness and lifeline are inspected by a competent person as recommended by the manufacturer, and after each fall-arresting incident.
    • A competent person determines if the personal fall arrest system, connecting linkage, full-body harness and lifeline are safe to use.
    • Workers using fall protection equipment inspect its components before each use.
    • Immediate steps are taken to protect the safety of a worker if a defect or unsafe conditions are identified.
    • Defective equipment is not used and is repaired as soon as reasonably practicable.

A worker who uses a lifeline and a lanyard must:

  • Inspect the lifeline and lanyard before using it, and make sure that is in good condition to be used,
  • Make sure that the lanyard is protected by padding from sharp edges, and
  • Make sure that during use, the lanyard is protected from heat, flames, or abrasive or corrosive materials.

Protection against drowning

Where a worker works in a place where they are at risk of falling and drowning, other than on a boat, the employer or contractor has the duty to:

  • Ensure that the worker is either protected by guardrails or by fall protection means (full-body harness and lifeline, or safety net).
  • Provide the worker with a life jacket and make sure that the worker uses it.
  • Provide rescue equipment and ensure that a team of trained workers is ready to implement rescue procedures.

Workers being transported or working on a boat must be provided with either a life jacket or a personal flotation device. The employer or contractor must make sure that the workers wear the lifejacket or personal flotation device all the time they are on the boat.

Occupational Health and Safety Regulations, 1996
S.S., c. O-1.1, Reg 1

Part I Preliminary Matters

Section 2 Interpretation

2. (1) In these regulations and in all other regulations made pursuant to the Act:

(a) "Act" means The Occupational Health and Safety Act, 1993 ;

(b) "air-purifying respirator" means a respirator that removes airborne contaminants from the air inhaled by a worker;

(c) "approved" means:

(i) approved by an agency acceptable to the director for use under the conditions prescribed by the agency; or

(ii) approved conditionally or otherwise by a certificate of the director;

(d) "atmosphere-supplying respirator" means a respirator that delivers clean breathing air to a worker from a compressor or a cylinder, an SCBA, whether closed or open circuit, or a combination of SCBA and supplied air;

(e) "borehole" means a mechanically drilled hole in the ground;

(f) "building shaft" means a continuous vertical space substantially enclosed on all sides that extends for two or more floors, and includes an elevator shaft, a ventilation shaft, a stairwell and a service shaft;

(g) "class A qualification" means a certificate or certificates that:

(i) are issued by an agency, as defined in section 50, with respect to the successful completion of a first aid training course and a cardiopulmonary resuscitation training course that meet the minimum requirements for course duration and content set out in Table 1 of the Appendix; and

(ii) qualify the holder to perform the services set out in Table 2 of the Appendix;

(h) "class B qualification" means a certificate or certificates that:

(i) are issued by an agency, as defined in section 50, with respect to the successful completion of a first aid training course and a cardiopulmonary resuscitation training course that meet the minimum requirements for course duration and content set out in Table 3 of the Appendix; and

(ii) qualify the holder to perform the services set out in Table 4 of the Appendix;

(i) "Class C fire" means a fire involving energized electrical equipment;

(j) "co-chairpersons" means, with respect to a committee, the employer or contractor co-chairperson appointed pursuant to clause 43(1)(b) and the worker co-chairperson elected pursuant to clause 43(1)(a);

(k) "committee" means an occupational health committee;

(l) "competent" means possessing knowledge, experience and training to perform a specific duty;

(m) "competent worker", with respect to a particular task or duty, includes a worker who is being trained to perform that task or carry out that duty and who is under close and competent supervision during that training;

(n) "connecting linkage" means a lanyard, safety hook, cable or connector inserted between a personal fall arrest system and the D-ring on a worker's full-body harness;

(o) "construction" means the erection, alteration, renovation, repair, dismantling, demolition, structural maintenance and painting of a structure, and includes:

(i) land clearing, earth moving, grading, excavating, trenching, digging, boring, drilling, blasting and concreting; and

(ii) the installation of any plant;

(p) "controlled product" means a controlled product within the meaning of the Hazardous Products Act (Canada);

(q) "dBA" means the sound pressure level in decibels measured on the A scale of a sound level meter;

(r) "dBA Lex" means the level of a worker's total exposure to noise, in dBA, averaged over an entire workday and adjusted to an equivalent eight-hour exposure;

(s) "designated signaller" means a worker designated pursuant to clause 132(1)(a) to give signals;

(t) "emergency medical technician" means a person who is licensed as an emergency medical technician, emergency medical technician-advanced or emergency medical technician-paramedic pursuant to The Ambulance Act;

(u) "escape respirator" means an atmosphere-supplying respirator or an air-purifying respirator that is designed to be used by a worker for escape purposes only;

(v) "excavated shaft" means a dug-out passage into the ground, the longest dimension of which exceeds 1.5 metres and of which the acute angle between the axis of the longest dimension and the vertical is less than 45;

(w) "excavation" means any dug-out area of ground other than a trench, tunnel or excavated shaft;

(x) "fall-arresting device" Repealed. [Sask. Reg. 67/2007, s. 3]

(y) "first aid" means immediate assistance given in case of injury until medical aid has been obtained;

(z) "first aid attendant" means the holder of a valid:

(i) class A qualification;

(ii) class B qualification;

(iii) emergency medical technician's licence; or

(iv) licence, certificate or other qualification that, in the opinion of the director, is equivalent to or superior to a qualification set out in subclauses (i) to (iii);

(aa) "first aid register" means the register required by section 57;

(bb) "first aid station" means a work-related area containing the supplies and equipment required by subsection 56(1);

(bb.1) "forklift" means a self-propelled machine that has a power-operated upright, angled or telescoping lifting device that can raise and lower a load for the purpose of transporting or stacking;

(cc) "full-body harness" means a safety device that is capable of suspending a worker without causing the worker to bend at the waist, and consists of straps that pass over the worker's shoulders and around the worker's legs, an upper dorsal suspension assembly and all integral hardware;

(dd) "hand tool" means hand-held equipment that is powered by the energy of a worker;

(ee) "harmful" means known to cause harm or injury;

(ff) "hazardous" means likely to cause harm or injury in certain circumstances;

(gg) "HEPA filter" means a high-efficiency particulate aerosol filter that is at least 99.97% efficient in collecting a 0.3 micrometre aerosol;

(hh) "hoist" means a machine that consists of a raising and lowering mechanism;

(ii) "immediately dangerous to life or health" means a condition in which a hazardous atmosphere exists to such an extent that a worker who is not using an approved respiratory protective device will suffer escape-impairing or irreversible health effects if the worker does not leave the hazardous atmosphere within 30 minutes;

(jj) "instruct" means to give information and direction to a worker with respect to particular subject-matter;

(kk) "lifeline" means a length of rope or strap that is attached to a safe point of anchorage at one end or, in the case of a horizontal lifeline, at both ends to provide support and a guide for a personal fall arrest system or personnel lowering device;

(ll) "locked out" means to have isolated the energy source or sources from equipment, to have dissipated any residual energy in a system and to have secured the isolation by a device that is operated by a key or other process;

(mm) "machine" means any combination of mechanical parts that transmits from one part to another or otherwise modifies force, motion or energy;

(nn) "maintained" means kept in a condition of efficient and safe functioning by a system of regular examination, testing and servicing or repair;

(oo) "The Mines Regulations" means The Mines Regulations, 2003 ;

(pp) "officer" means an occupational health officer;

(qq) "operator" means a person who operates any equipment;

(qq.1) "percutaneous" means a route of entry that is through the skin or mucous membrane, and includes subcutaneous, intramuscular and intravascular routes of entry.

(qq.2) "personal fall arrest system" means personal protective equipment that provides a means of safely arresting the fall of a worker and that, subsequent to the arrest of the fall, does not by itself permit the further release or lowering of the worker;

(rr) "personal protective equipment" means any clothing, device or other article that is intended to be worn or used by a worker to prevent injury or to facilitate rescue;

(ss) "personnel lowering device" means a device that provides a means of lowering a worker from a height at a controlled rate of descent;

(tt) "power tool" means a hand-held machine that is powered by energy other than the energy of a worker;

(uu) "powered mobile equipment" means a self-propelled machine or a combination of machines, including a prime mover, that is designed to manipulate or move materials or to provide a work platform for workers;

(vv) "professional engineer" means an engineer who is registered pursuant to The Engineering Profession Act;

(ww) "public highway" means a public highway as defined in The Highways and Transportation Act, 1997 ;

(xx) "qualified" means possessing a recognized degree, a recognized certificate or a recognized professional standing and demonstrating, by knowledge, training and experience, the ability to deal with problems related to the subject-matter, the work or the project;

(yy) "representative" means an occupational health and safety representative;

(zz) "respiratory protective device" means a device that is designed to protect a wearer from inhaling a hazardous atmosphere, and includes an atmosphere-supplying respirator, an air-purifying respirator and an escape respirator;

(aaa) "safeguard" means a guard, shield, wire mesh, guardrail, gate, barrier, safety net, handrail or other similar equipment that is designed to protect the safety of workers, but does not include personal protective equipment;

(bbb) "safety belt" Repealed. [Sask. Reg. 67/2007, s. 3]

(ccc) "SCBA" means self-contained breathing apparatus;

(ddd) "supervisor" means a person who is authorized by an employer to oversee or direct the work of workers;

(eee) "train" means to give information and explanation to a worker with respect to a particular subject-matter and require a practical demonstration that the worker has acquired knowledge or skill related to the subject-matter;

(fff) "travelway" means any place where workers or vehicles regularly travel or pass, and includes a ramp, runway, catwalk, bridge, conveyor, gantry or passage;

(ggg) "trench" means an elongated dug-out area of land whose depth exceeds its width at the bottom;

(hhh) "tunnel" means an underground passage that has an incline of not more than 45 from the horizontal;

(iii) "vehicle" means a machine in, on or by which a person or thing may be transported, and includes powered mobile equipment;

(jjj) "work" and "at work" means:

(i) the time during which a worker is in the course of the worker's employment; or

(ii) the time that a self-employed person devotes to work as a self-employed person;

(kkk) "work-related area" means all places that are ancillary to a place of employment, and includes lunchrooms, restrooms, first aid rooms, lecture rooms, parking lots under the control of the employer or contractor, offices and work camp living accommodations, but does not include a permanent living accommodation.

(2) For the purposes of the Act and in these regulations and all other regulations made pursuant to the Act, "injury" includes any disease and any impairment of the physical or mental condition of a person.

(3) Any word or expression used but not defined in these regulations or the Act has the meaning commonly given to it at places of employment in the industry concerned.

(4) Unless otherwise expressly stated:

(a) lumber sizes specified in these regulations are lumber sizes after dressing; and

(b) "lumber" means lumber that is free of visible defects.

[Sask. Reg. 6/97, s. 3; 35/2003, s. 3; 112/2005, s. 3; 67/2007, s. 3]

3. Repealed. [Sask. Reg. 35/2003, s. 4]

Part VIII Noise Control and Hearing Conservation

Section 113 Daily exposure greater than 85 dBA Lex

113. (1) Where a worker's occupational noise exposure equals or exceeds 85 dBA Lex, an employer or contractor shall:

(a) inform the worker of the hazards of occupational noise exposure;

(b) take all reasonably practicable steps to reduce noise levels in all areas where the worker may be required or permitted to work;

(c) minimize the worker's occupational noise exposure to the extent that is reasonably practicable; and

(d) document the steps taken pursuant to clauses (b) and (c).

(2) Where, in the opinion of the employer or contractor, it is not reasonably practicable to reduce noise levels or minimize the worker's occupational noise exposure to less than 85 dBA Lex, an employer or contractor shall provide written reasons for that opinion to the committee and, where there is no committee, shall inform the workers of the reasons for that opinion.

(3) Where it is not reasonably practicable to reduce a worker's occupational noise exposure below 85 dBA Lex or the noise level below 90 dBA in any area where a worker may be required or permitted to work, an employer or contractor shall:

(a) provide a hearing protector to the worker that meets the requirements of section 99;

(b) train the worker in the selection, use and maintenance of the hearing protector; and

(c) arrange for the worker to have, at least once every 24 months during the worker's normal working hours, an audiometric test and appropriate counselling based on the test results under the direction of a physician, an audiologist or a registered nurse who has a certificate in audiometric testing.

(4) Where a worker cannot attend an audiometric test mentioned in clause (3)(c) during the worker's normal working hours, an employer or contractor shall credit the worker's attendance at the test as time at work and ensure that the worker does not lose any pay or other benefits.

(5) Where a worker cannot recover the costs of a audiometric test mentioned in clause (3)(c), an employer or contractor shall reimburse the worker for the costs of the test that, in the opinion of the director, are reasonable.

Part IX Safeguards, Storage, Warning Signs and Signals

Section 125 Building shafts

125. (1) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that a work platform that is an integral part of a slip form used in a building shaft is designed by a professional engineer to withstand the maximum foreseeable load and is constructed, erected and used in accordance with that design.

(2) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that a platform mentioned in subsection (1) that has been moved is examined by a competent person and that a written report of the examination is made by the person who carried it out and kept by the employer, contractor or owner.

(3) An employer, contractor or owner shall not require or permit a worker to work on a platform mentioned in subsection (1) that has been moved before the platform has been examined in accordance with subsection (2), unless the worker is using a personal fall arrest system, a full-body harness, a lanyard or a lifeline that meets the requirements of Part VII.

(4) Where there is no work platform installed at the level of a doorway or opening in a building shaft, an employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that the doorway or opening is covered by a solid barrier that extends from the bottom of the doorway or opening to a height of at least two metres and is capable of preventing a worker or loose material from falling down the shaft.

(5) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that at least one warning sign indicating the presence of an open building shaft is placed on a barrier erected pursuant to subsection (4).

[Sask. Reg. 67/2007, s. 12]

Part XII Scaffolds, Aerial Devices, Elevating Work Platforms and Temporary Supporting Structures

Section 186 Use of suspended powered scaffolds

186. (1) An employer or contractor shall:

(a) develop work practices and procedures for the safe use of any suspended powered scaffold;

(b) train the workers in the procedures required pursuant to clause (a); and

(c) ensure that every worker complies with the procedures required pursuant to clause (a).

(2) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a suspended powered scaffold is operated by a competent worker.

(3) An employer or contractor shall ensure that all parts of a suspended powered scaffold are inspected prior to use and daily when in use.

(4) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a worker who works on a suspended powered scaffold is provided with and uses a full-body harness, connecting linkage, personal fall arrest system and lifeline that meet the requirements of Part VII.

[Sask. Reg. 67/2007, s. 18]

Section 192 Aerial devices and elevating work platforms

192. (1) An employer or contractor shall ensure that:

(a) an aerial device, elevating work platform or personnel lifting unit is designed, constructed, erected, operated and maintained in accordance with an approved standard; or

(b) a professional engineer has certified that:

(i) an aerial device, elevating work platform or personnel lifting unit and its elevating system and mountings are safe for the purpose of raising workers and loads; and

(ii) the components of an aerial device, elevating work platform or personnel lifting unit and its elevating system and mountings are designed in accordance with an approved standard.

(2) An employer or contractor shall not require or permit a worker to be raised or lowered by any aerial device or elevating work platform or to work from a device or platform held in an elevated position unless:

(a) there is an adequate and suitable means of communication between the worker operating the controls and the worker raised on the platform, if they are not the same person;

(b) the elevating mechanism is designed so that, if any failure of the mechanism occurs, the platform will descend in a controlled manner so that no worker on the platform will be endangered;

(c) the controls are designed so that the platform will be moved only when direct pressure is applied to the controls;

(d) the drive mechanism of any operation for moving the platform is positive and does not rely on gravity;

(e) road traffic conditions, environmental conditions, overhead wires, cables and other obstructions do not create a danger to the worker;

(f) the brakes of the aerial device or elevating work platform are engaged, except when operated in accordance with manufacturer's recommendations;

(g) if the aerial device or elevating work platform is equipped with outriggers, the outriggers are set;

(h) pursuant to clause (i), the worker is provided with and is required to use a personal fall arrest system that meets the requirements of Part VII; and

(i) the aerial device or elevating work platform is equipped with a lanyard attachment point that is:

(i) designed and constructed to an approved standard; or

(ii) certified as safe by a professional engineer and installed and used in accordance with that design.

(3) Notwithstanding any other provision in this section but subject to section 465, an employer or contractor shall not require or permit a worker working on an exposed energized high voltage electrical conductor to work from an aerial device or elevating work platform unless the controls are operated by the worker on the device or platform.

(4) Where a worker leaves an aerial device or elevating work platform parked or unattended, an employer or contractor shall ensure that the device or platform:

(a) is locked or rendered inoperative; or

(b) is fully lowered and retracted with all hydraulic systems in the neutral position or incapable of operating by moving the controls.

(5) An employer or contractor shall ensure that:

(a) a worker who operates an aerial device or elevating work platform is trained to operate the device or platform safely; and

(b) the training includes the manufacturer's instructions and recommendations, the load limitations, the proper use of all controls and any limitations on the surfaces on which the device or platform is designed to be used.

(5.1) An employer or contractor shall ensure that, while a worker is on a work platform mounted on a forklift and the forklift is in the raised position, the operator:

(a) remains at the controls; and

(b) does not drive the forklift.

(6) An employer or contractor shall ensure that the manufacturer's operating manual for the aerial device or elevating work platform is kept with the device or platform at all times.

[Sask. Reg. 67/2007, s. 20]

Section 194 Forklifts

194. (1) An employer or contractor shall ensure that no worker is raised or lowered by, or required or permitted to work on, a forklift or any device mounted on a forklift except as provided by this section.

(2) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a work platform mounted on a forklift on which a worker may be raised or lowered or required or permitted to work is:

(a) designed and constructed to an approved standard or designed and constructed and certified safe for use by a professional engineer to support safely the maximum load that the platform is expected to support;

(b) securely attached to the forks of the forklift to prevent accidental lateral or vertical movement of the platform;

(c) equipped with guardrails and toeboards that meet the requirements of sections 122 and 123; and

(d) equipped with a screen or similar barrier along the edge of the platform adjacent to the mast of the forklift to prevent a worker from contacting the mast drive mechanism.

(3) The employer or contractor shall ensure that a worker working from a work platform mentioned in subsection (2) uses a personal fall arrest system that meets the requirements of Part VII.

(4) An employer or contractor shall comply with the requirements mentioned in section 167.

[Sask. Reg. 67/2007, s. 21]

Part XIII Hoists, Cranes and Lifting Devices

Section 207 Raising and lowering workers

207. (1) Where a crane or hoist will be used to raise or lower workers, the employer or contractor shall:

(a) develop and implement work practices and procedures that will provide for the safe raising and lowering of the workers;

(b) train the workers in those work practices and procedures;

(c) ensure that the hoisting equipment and personnel lifting unit are inspected by a competent person before use and daily when in use; and

(d) ensure that the competent person records the details of the inspection in the log book.

(2) An employer or contractor shall not require or permit the operator of a crane or hoist to use the crane or hoist to raise or lower workers unless:

(a) the personnel lifting unit meets the requirements of subsection 192(1);

(b) the suspension members of the personnel lifting unit are securely attached to the crane, hoist line or hook by a shackle, weldless link, ring or other secure rigging attachment;

(c) there is a secondary safety device that attaches the suspension members of the personnel lifting unit to the crane or hoist rigging above the point of attachment mentioned in clause (b);

(d) the load line hoist drum has a system or device on the power train, other than the load hoist brake, that regulates the lowering rate of speed of the hoist drum mechanism; and

(e) workers in the personnel lifting unit use a full-body harness attached to the personnel lifting unit.

(3) An operator of a crane or hoist shall not use the crane or hoist to raise or lower workers unless:

(a) the personnel lifting unit meets the requirements of section 192;

(b) the suspension members of the personnel lifting unit are securely attached to the crane, hoist line or hook by a shackle, weldless link, ring or other secure rigging attachment;

(c) there is a secondary safety device that attaches the suspension members of the personnel lifting unit to the crane or hoist rigging above the point of attachment mentioned in clause (b);

(d) the load line hoist drum has a system or device on the power train, other than the load hoist brake, that regulates the lowering rate of speed of the hoist drum mechanism; and

(e) workers in the personnel lifting unit use fall-arrest protection attached to the personnel lifting unit.

[Sask. Reg. 67/2007, s. 22]

Part XVI Entrances, Exits and Ladders

Section 255 Fixed ladders

255. (1) In this section, "fixed ladder" means a ladder that is fixed to a structure in a vertical position or at an angle that is between vertical and 25 to the vertical, but does not include a ladder used in underground mining operations to which The Mines Regulations apply.

(2) A ladder that is fixed to a structure at an angle of more than 25 to the vertical, or more than one horizontal to two vertical, is deemed to be a stairway and is subject to the requirements of sections 121 and 251.

(3) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that:

(a) the rungs on a fixed ladder are uniformly spaced with centres that are not less than 250 and not more than 300 millimetres apart;

(b) a clearance of at least 150 millimetres is maintained between the rungs on a fixed ladder and the structure to which the ladder is affixed;

(c) a fixed ladder is securely held in place at the top and bottom and at any intermediate points that are necessary to prevent sway;

(d) the side rails of a fixed ladder extend not less than one metre above any platform, roof or other landing on the structure to which the ladder is fixed;

(e) a ladder opening in a platform, roof or other landing does not exceed 750 millimetres by 750 millimetres;

(f) a fixed ladder that is more than six metres high:

(i) is equipped with:

(A) platforms at intervals of not more than six metres or ladder cages, in the case of ladders installed on or before March 11, 1986; or

(B) platforms at intervals of not more than six metres and ladder cages, in the case of ladders installed on or after March 12, 1986; or

(ii) is equipped with a personal fall arrest system that meets the requirements of Part VII.

(g) a fixed ladder in an excavated shaft is installed in a compartment that is separated from the hoist compartment by a substantial partition.

(4) Where a ladder cage is required by these regulations, an employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that:

(a) the ladder cage is constructed of hoops that are not more than 1.8 metres apart, joined by vertical members not more than 300 millimetres apart around the circumference of the hoop;

(b) no point on a hoop of the ladder cage is more than 750 millimetres from the ladder; and

(c) the ladder cage is of sufficient strength and is designed to contain any worker who may lean or fall against a hoop.

(5) In the case of a ladder cage constructed before July 1, 1997, an employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that:

(a) the lowest hoop of the ladder cage is not more than three metres from a platform, landing or the ground; and

(b) the uppermost hoop of the ladder cage is at the level of a platform, landing or roof.

(6) In the case of a ladder cage constructed on or after July 1, 1997, an employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that:

(a) the lowest hoop of the ladder cage is not more than 2.2 metres from a platform, landing or the ground; and

(b) the uppermost hoop of the ladder cage extends at least one metre above the level of a platform, landing or roof.

[Sask. Reg. 67/2007, s. 23]

Part XVIII Confined Space Entry

Section 274 Precautions where safe atmosphere not possible

274. (1) Where a hazardous confined space cannot be purged and ventilated to provide a safe atmosphere or a safe atmosphere cannot be maintained pursuant to section 273, an employer shall ensure that no work is carried on in the confined space except in accordance with the requirements of this section and section 369.

(2) An employer shall ensure that a competent person continuously monitors the atmosphere in a hazardous confined space.

(3) An employer shall ensure that a worker is provided with and required to use a respiratory protective device that meets the requirements of Part VII if:

(a) the airborne concentration for any substance meets or exceeds the permissible contamination limit mentioned in clause 307(1)(a);

(b) oxygen deficiency or enrichment is detected; or

(c) the airborne concentration of any other substance may be harmful to the worker.

(4) An employer shall ensure that a worker in a hazardous confined space is attended by and in communication with another worker who:

(a) has been adequately trained in the rescue procedures mentioned in clause 272(2)(g);

(b) is stationed and remains at the entrance to the confined space unless replaced by another adequately trained worker; and

(c) is equipped with a suitable alarm to summon assistance.

(5) If entrance to a hazardous confined space is from the top:

(a) an employer shall ensure that:

(i) a worker uses a full-body harness and, where appropriate, is attached to a lifeline;

(ii) if a lifeline is used, the lifeline is attended by another worker who is adequately trained in the rescue procedures mentioned in clause 272(2)(g); and

(iii) where reasonably practicable, a mechanical lifting device is available to assist with a rescue and is located at the entry to the confined space while a worker is in the confined space; or

(b) an employer shall ensure that an alternate method of rescue is developed and implemented where the use of a full-body harness or lifeline would create an additional hazard.

(6) If any flammable or explosive dusts, gases, vapours or liquids are or may be present in a hazardous confined space, an employer shall ensure that all sources of ignition are eliminated or controlled.

(7) An employer shall ensure that:

(a) equipment necessary to rescue workers is readily available at the entrance to the hazardous confined space and used in accordance with the rescue procedures developed pursuant to clause 272(2)(g);

(b) the holder of a class A qualification in first aid is available to provide immediate first aid; and

(c) personnel who are trained in the rescue procedures developed pursuant to clause 272(2)(g) and who are fully informed of the hazards in the confined space are readily available to assist in a rescue procedure.

Part VII Personal Protective Equipment

Section 86 Use of equipment required

86. (1) Where it is not reasonably practicable to protect the health and safety of workers by design of the plant and work processes, suitable work practices or administrative controls, an employer or contractor shall ensure that every worker wears or uses suitable and adequate personal protective equipment.

(2) Where personal protective equipment will not effectively protect a worker, an employer or contractor shall, where reasonably practicable, provide alternative work arrangements for that worker.

Section 87 General responsibilities

87. (1) Where an employer or contractor is required by these regulations or any other regulations made pursuant to the Act to provide personal protective equipment, the employer or contractor shall:

(a) supply approved personal protective equipment to the workers at no cost to the workers;

(b) ensure that the personal protective equipment is used by the workers;

(c) ensure that the personal protective equipment is at the worksite before work begins;

(d) ensure that the personal protective equipment is stored in a clean, secure location that is readily accessible to workers;

(e) ensure that each worker is aware of the location of the personal protective equipment and trained in its use;

(f) inform the workers of the reasons why the personal protective equipment is required to be used and of the limitations of its protection; and

(g) ensure that personal protective equipment provided to a worker:

(i) is suitable and adequate and a proper fit for that worker;

(ii) is maintained and kept in a sanitary condition; and

(iii) is removed from use or service when damaged.

(2) Where an employer or contractor requires a worker to clean and maintain personal protective equipment, the employer shall ensure that the worker has adequate time during normal working hours without loss of pay or other benefits for this purpose.

(3) Where reasonably practicable, an employer or contractor shall make appropriate adjustments to the work procedures and the rate of work to eliminate or reduce the danger or discomfort to the worker that may arise from the worker's use of personal protective equipment.

(4) A worker who is provided with personal protective equipment by an employer or contractor shall:

(a) use the personal protective equipment; and

(b) take reasonable steps to prevent damage to the personal protective equipment.

(5) Where personal protective equipment provided to a worker becomes defective or otherwise fails to provide the protection it was intended for, the worker shall:

(a) return the personal protective equipment to the employer or contractor; and

(b) inform the employer or contractor of the defect or other reason why the personal protective equipment does not provide the protection that it was intended to provide.

(6) An employer or contractor shall immediately repair or replace any personal protective equipment returned to the employer or contractor pursuant to clause (5)(a).

Section 88 Respiratory protective devices

88. (1) Where a worker is likely to be exposed to dust, fumes, gas, mist, aerosol or vapour or any airborne contaminant that may be present in any amounts that are harmful or offensive to the worker, an employer or contractor shall:

(a) provide an approved respiratory protective device for use by the worker that:

(i) provides suitable and adequate protection to the worker from one or more airborne contaminants;

(ii) is the proper size for the worker's face;

(iii) where a tight fit is essential to the proper functioning of the respiratory protective device, makes an effective seal to the facial skin of the worker; and

(iv) where a tight fit is essential to ensure the worker is not exposed to one or more airborne contaminants to an extent that may pose a risk of significant harm to the worker, has been fit-tested by a competent person in an approved manner;

(b) ensure that the respiratory protective device is regularly cleaned and maintained in an approved manner; and

(c) ensure that the respiratory protective device is kept, when not in use, in a convenient and sanitary location in which the respiratory protective device is not exposed to extremes of temperature or to any contaminant that may inactivate the respiratory protective device.

(2) If a respiratory protective device as required by subsection (1) is provided to a worker, the employer or contractor shall ensure that the worker:

(a) has been trained by a competent person in the proper testing, maintenance, use and cleaning of the respiratory protective device and in its limitations;

(b) can demonstrate that he or she:

(i) understands the training provided pursuant to clause (a);

(ii) can test, maintain and clean the respiratory protective device; and

(iii) can use the respiratory protective device safely;

(c) tests the respiratory protective device before each use;

(d) is assessed according to an approved standard as being capable of wearing a respiratory protective device; and

(e) is adequately informed respecting the reasons for the assessment required pursuant to clause (d).

(3) An employer or contractor shall ensure that the training required by clause (2)(a) includes practical experience by the worker in an uncontaminated environment.

(4) Where respiratory protective devices are used only for emergency purposes, an employer or contractor shall ensure that a worker who may be required to use a respiratory protective device is given semi-annual refresher training in its safe use.

(5) An employer shall ensure that the following records are kept as long as the worker is employed by the employer and made readily available for inspection and examination by the committee or the representative, as the case may be:

(a) records respecting fit-testing for each worker that is completed pursuant to subclause (1)(a)(iv);

(b) records respecting the results of assessments for each worker that are completed pursuant to clause (2)(d);

(c) records respecting training completed by each worker pursuant to subsections (2) and (3).

(6) An employer shall ensure that any records mentioned in clause (5)(b) respecting a worker that are made available for inspection and examination pursuant to subsection (5) do not disclose any personal health information as defined in The Health Information Protection Act respecting the worker, unless the worker agrees to that disclosure.

(7) An employer shall ensure that records respecting the maintenance of atmosphere-supplying respirators are kept and made readily available for inspection and examination by the committee or the representative as long as that worker is employed by the employer.

(8) A worker may, at any time, inspect and examine any records kept pursuant to subsection (5) or (7) that relate to the worker.

[Sask. Reg. 6/97, s. 6; 67/2007, s. 4]

Section 89 Inspection of respiratory protective devices

89. An employer or contractor shall ensure that:

(a) any respiratory protective device for emergency use is thoroughly inspected by a competent person at least once a month and after each use;

(b) the date of every inspection made pursuant to clause (a) and the name of the person who made the inspection are recorded and conspicuously displayed at the location where the respiratory protective device is stored; and

(c) any defects identified during the inspection carried out pursuant to clause (a) are corrected immediately by a competent person.

Section 90 Working in dangerous atmospheres

90. (1) Where a worker is required to enter an atmosphere that is immediately dangerous to the life or health of the worker, an employer or contractor shall ensure that the worker is provided with and uses an approved atmosphere-supplying respirator that is:

(a) an open-circuit SCBA that:

(i) operates in a pressure demand or other positive pressure mode;

(ii) has a minimum rated capacity of 30 minutes;

(iii) is sufficiently charged to enable the worker to perform the work safely; and

(iv) is equipped with a low-pressure warning device or an escape respirator;

(b) an airline respirator equipped with a full facepiece that:

(i) operates in a pressure demand or other positive pressure mode; and

(ii) has an auxiliary supply of air sufficient to allow the worker to escape in case of failure of the primary air supply equipment; or

(c) a closed-circuit SCBA.

(2) Where a worker is required to enter an atmosphere that is immediately dangerous to life or health, an employer or contractor shall ensure that:

(a) a second worker, suitably equipped and trained, is present and in communication with the worker at all times; and

(b) suitably equipped personnel who are trained in rescue procedures and are fully informed of the hazards are readily available to rescue the endangered worker immediately if the worker's atmosphere-supplying respirator fails or the worker becomes incapacitated for any other reason.

(3) An employer or contractor shall ensure that compressed air in an atmosphere-supplying respirator used by a worker in an atmosphere that is immediately dangerous to the worker's life or health meets the purity requirements set out in Table 2 of the Canadian Standards Association standard CAN3-Z180.1-M85 Compressed Breathing Air and Systems.

Section 91 Protective headwear

91. (1) Where there is a risk of injury to the head of a worker, an employer or contractor shall provide approved industrial protective headwear and require a worker to use it.

(2) The following places are deemed to be places where a worker is exposed to a risk described in subsection (1):

(a) a mine, mill or smelter;

(b) a forestry or sawmilling operation;

(c) a construction site;

(d) a drilling operation;

(e) an oil or gas servicing operation.

(3) Where a worker may contact an exposed energized electrical conductor, an employer or contractor shall provide, and require the worker to use, approved industrial protective headwear that is of adequate dielectric strength to protect the worker.

(4) Where a worker is required by these regulations to use industrial protective headwear, an employer or contractor shall provide to the worker:

(a) a suitable liner where it is necessary to protect the worker from cold conditions; and

(b) a retention system to secure the industrial protective headwear firmly to the worker's head where the worker is likely to work in conditions that may cause the headwear to dislodge.

(5) An employer or contractor shall ensure that any industrial protective headwear provided to a worker pursuant to these regulations is fluorescent orange or other high visibility colour where:

(a) the worker is working in a forestry or sawmilling operation; or

(b) visibility of the worker is necessary to protect the health and safety of the worker.

(6) An employer or contractor shall not require or permit a worker to use any industrial protective headwear that:

(a) is damaged or structurally modified;

(b) has been subjected to severe impact; or

(c) has been painted or has been cleaned with solvents.

Section 92 Workers using all terrain vehicles, snowmobiles, etc.

92. (1) In this section:

(a) "all terrain vehicle" means an all terrain vehicle as defined in The All Terrain Vehicles Act ;

(b) "snowmobile" means a snowmobile as defined in The Snowmobile Act;

(c) "towed conveyance" means any sled, cutter, trailer, toboggan or carrier that may be towed by a snowmobile or an all terrain vehicle.

(2) An employer or contractor shall ensure that every worker who is required or permitted to travel in or on an all terrain vehicle, a snowmobile or a towed conveyance is provided with and required to use:

(a) approved protective headgear; and

(b) approved eye or face protectors if the all terrain vehicle, snowmobile or towed conveyance does not have an enclosed cab.

(3) Subsection (2) does not apply where:

(a) the all terrain vehicle is equipped with roll-over protective structures and enclosed by a cab that is an integral part of the vehicle; and

(b) the worker is provided with a seat-belt secured to the vehicle and is required to use it.

(4) Where a worker is required by these regulations to use protective headgear while working in cold conditions, the headgear must be equipped with a suitable liner and a cold weather face guard.

Section 93 Eye and face protectors

93. (1) Where there is a risk of irritation or injury to the face or eyes of a worker from flying objects or particles, splashing liquids, molten metal or ultraviolet, visible or infrared radiation, an employer or contractor shall provide industrial eye or face protectors and require the worker to use them.

(2) Where an industrial eye or face protector is required by these regulations to be provided or used, the industrial eye or face protector must be approved.

(3) An employer or contractor shall take all reasonable steps to ensure that a worker does not perform electric are welding if another worker may be exposed to radiation from the are unless the other worker is using a suitable industrial eye protector or is protected from the radiation by a suitable screen.

(4) A worker shall not perform electric are welding if another worker may be exposed to radiation from the are unless the other worker is using a suitable industrial eye protector or is protected from the radiation by a suitable screen.

Section 94 Skin protection

94. (1) Where there is a risk of injury to the skin of a worker from sparks, molten metal or radiation, an employer or contractor shall provide, and require the worker to use, approved protective clothing or covers or any other safeguard that provides equivalent protection for the worker.

(2) Where there is a risk of injury to the skin of a worker from fire or explosion, an employer or contractor shall provide the worker with, and require the worker to use, outer fire resistant clothing that:

(a) meets an approved industry standard; and

(b) is appropriate to the risk.

(3) Where there is a risk of injury to the skin of an electrical worker from arc flash, an employer or contractor shall provide the electrical worker with, and require the electrical worker to use, arc flash protection that meets an approved standard.

[Sask. Reg. 67/2007, s. 5]

Section 95 Lower body protection

95. (1) Where a worker is at risk of a cut, puncture, irritation or abrasion to the worker's lower body, an employer or contractor shall ensure that the worker uses safety pants or chaps that are appropriate for the work being performed by the worker.

(2) A worker operating a chain saw is deemed to be exposed to the risk described in subsection (1).

Section 96 Footwear

96. (1) Subject to subsection (4), an employer or contractor shall ensure that:

(a) a worker uses footwear that is appropriate to the risks associated with the worker's place of employment and occupation; and

(b) a worker who may be at risk from a heavy or falling object or who may tread on a sharp object uses approved protective footwear.

(2) The following places are deemed to be places where a worker is exposed to a risk described in clause (1)(b):

(a) a mine, mill or smelter;

(b) a forestry or sawmilling operation;

(c) a construction site;

(d) a drilling operation;

(e) an oil or gas servicing operation.

(3) An employer or contractor shall:

(a) provide outer foot guards if there is substantial risk of a crushing injury to the foot of a worker; and

(b) provide approved protective footwear if the feet of a worker may be endangered by hot, corrosive or toxic substances.

(4) After consultation with the committee, the representative or, where there is no committee or representative, the workers, an employer or contractor may:

(a) permit the following to use approved soft-soled footwear without puncture-proof plates in the soles:

(i) workers who are competent steel erectors engaged in the connection of structural components of a skeletal structure;

(ii) competent workers who are engaged in the installation of a roof; and

(b) impose any conditions that the employer or contractor considers appropriate on the use of footwear described in clause (a).

Section 97 Hand and arm protection

97. (1) An employer or contractor shall provide, and require a worker to use, suitable and properly fitted hand or arm protection to protect the worker from injury to the hand or arm, including:

(a) injury arising from contact with chemical or biological substances;

(b) injury arising from exposure to work processes that result in extreme temperatures;

(c) injury arising from prolonged exposure to water; and

(d) puncture, abrasion or irritation of the skin.

(2) Where a worker may contact an exposed energized high voltage electrical conductor, an employer or contractor shall provide, and require the worker to use, approved rubber insulating gloves and mitts and approved rubber insulating sleeves.

Section 98 Exposure to hazardous substances

98. Where workers are routinely exposed to a hazardous material or substance, an employer or contractor shall provide, and require workers to use, protective clothing, gloves and eyewear or face shields that are adequate to prevent exposure of a worker's skin and mucous membranes to the hazardous material or substance.

Section 99 Exposure to noise

99. (1) Where a worker is required or permitted by these regulations to use hearing protectors, an employer or contractor shall:

(a) provide approved hearing protectors; and

(b) require workers to use those hearing protectors where the worker is required to use hearing protectors by these regulations.

(2) Where practicable, an employer or contractor shall ensure that a hearing protector provided pursuant to subsection (1) reduces the noise level received into the worker's ears to not more than 85 dBA.

(3) Where it is not practicable to comply with subsection (2), an employer or contractor shall ensure that a hearing protector provided pursuant to subsection (1) reduces the noise level received into the worker's ears to the lowest level that is practicable.

(4) Where an employer or contractor provides a worker with a hearing protector that depends for effectiveness on a close approximation of size or shape to the auditory canal of its user, the employer or contractor shall ensure that the hearing protector is fitted to the worker by a competent person.

100. Repealed. [Sask. Reg. 67/2007, s. 6]

Section 101 Lifelines

101. (1) Unless otherwise specifically provided, an employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that a lifeline:

(a) is suitable for the conditions in which the lifeline is to be used, having regard to factors including strength, abrasion resistance, extensibility and chemical stability;

(b) is made of wire rope or synthetic material;

(c) is free of imperfections, knots and splices, other than end terminations;

(d) is protected by padding where the lifeline passes over sharp edges;

(e) is protected from heat, flame or abrasive or corrosive materials during use;

(f) is fastened to a secure anchor point that:

(i) has a breaking strength of at least 22.2 kilonewtons; and

(ii) is not used to suspend any platform or other load;

(g) is maintained according to the manufacturer's recommendation.

(1.1) Unless otherwise specifically provided, an employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that there is a lifeline that meets the requirements of this section for every worker.

(2) Unless otherwise specifically provided, an employer or contractor shall ensure that a vertical lifeline required by these regulations has a minimum diameter of:

(a) 12 millimetres if the lifeline is made of nylon;

(b) 15 millimetres if the lifeline is made of polypropylene; or

(c) eight millimetres if the lifeline is made of wire rope.

(3) An employer or contractor shall ensure that where a vertical lifeline is used:

(a) the lower end extends to the ground or to a safe landing; and

(b) the lifeline is protected at the lower end to ensure that the line cannot be fouled by any equipment.

(4) Unless otherwise specifically provided, an employer or contractor shall ensure that a horizontal lifeline is:

(a) either:

(i) designed and certified as safe by a professional engineer; or

(ii) manufactured to an approved standard; and

(b) installed and used in accordance with the design mentioned in clause (a) or the manufacturer's recommendations.

[Sask. Reg. 67/2007, s. 7; 91/2007, s. 3]

Section 102 Personal fall arrest systems

102. (1) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a personal fall arrest system and connecting linkage required by these regulations are approved and maintained.

(2) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a personal fall arrest system required by these regulations:

(a) prevents a worker from falling more than 1.2 metres without a shock absorber;

(b) where a shock absorber is used, prevents a worker from falling more than two metres or the limit specified in the manufacturer's specifications, whichever is less;

(c) applies a peak fall-arrest force not greater than eight kilonewtons to a worker; and

(d) is fastened to a lifeline or to a secure anchor point that has a breaking strength of at least 22.2 kilonewtons.

[Sask. Reg. 67/2007, s. 8]

Section 103 Full-body harness

103. Where a full-body harness is used, an employer or contractor shall ensure that:

(a) the full-body harness and connecting linkage are approved and maintained;

(b) the full-body harness is properly fitted to the worker;

(c) the worker is trained in the safe use of the full-body harness;

(d) all metal parts of the full-body harness and connecting linkage are of drop-forged steel 22.2 kilonewtons proof tested;

(e) a protective thimble is used to protect ropes or straps from chafing whenever a rope or strap is connected to an eye or a D-ring used in the fullbody harness or connecting linkage; and

(f) the connecting linkage is attached to a personal fall arrest system, lifeline or secure anchor point to prevent the worker from falling more than 1.2 metres.

[Sask. Reg. 67/2007, s. 8]

Section 104 Snap hooks on personal fall arrest system

104. Where a snap hook is used as an integral component of a personal fall arrest system, connecting linkage, full-body harness or lifeline, an employer or contractor shall ensure that the snap hook is self-locking and is approved and maintained.

[Sask. Reg. 67/2007, s. 8]

Section 106 Workers' responsibilities re lifelines, etc.

106. (1) Before using a lifeline or lanyard, a worker shall ensure that the lifeline or lanyard:

(a) is free of imperfections, knots and splices, other than end terminations;

(b) is protected by padding where the lifeline or lanyard passes over sharp edges; and

(c) is protected from heat, flame or abrasive or corrosive materials during use.

(2) Before using a vertical lifeline, a worker shall ensure that:

(a) the lower end extends to the ground or to a safe landing; and

(b) the lifeline is protected at the lower end to ensure that the line cannot be fouled by any equipment.

(3) Before using a full-body harness, a worker shall ensure that the full-body harness:

(a) is properly adjusted to fit the worker securely; and

(b) subject to subsection 274(5), is attached by means of a connecting linkage to a fixed anchor or a lifeline.

(4) A worker who uses a full-body harness and connecting linkage shall ensure that the connecting linkage is attached to a personal fall arrest system, lifeline or a fixed anchor.

[Sask. Reg. 67/2007, s. 9]

Section 107 Inspection of full body harness, etc.

107. (1) Where the use of a connecting linkage, personal fall arrest system, full-body harness or lifeline is required by these regulations, an employer or contractor shall ensure that a competent person:

(a) inspects the connecting linkage, personal fall arrest system, full-body harness or lifeline:

(i) as recommended by the manufacturer; and

(ii) after the connecting linkage, personal fall arrest system, full-body harness or lifeline has sustained a fall-arresting incident; and

(b) determines whether the connecting linkage, personal fall arrest system, full-body harness or lifeline is safe for continued use.

(2) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a worker inspects the connecting linkage, personal fall arrest system, full-body harness or lifeline before each use and that where a defect or unsafe condition that may create a hazard to a worker is identified in a connecting linkage, personal fall arrest system, full-body harness or lifeline:

(a) steps are taken immediately to protect the health and safety of any worker who may be at risk until the defect is repaired or the unsafe condition is corrected; and

(b) as soon as is reasonably practicable, the defect is repaired or the unsafe condition is corrected.

[Sask. Reg. 67/2007, s. 10]

Section 108 Protection against drowning

108. (1) In this section:

(a) "buoyant apparatus" means a device that is capable of supporting the weight in water of a worker and that is constructed to:

(i) remain stable when floating on either side;

(ii) have no projections that would prevent the buoyant apparatus from sliding easily over the side of a boat or ship; and

(iii) require no adjustment before use;

(b) "life jacket" means an approved device that is capable of keeping a worker's head above water in a face-up position without effort by the worker;

(c) "personal flotation device" means an approved device that is capable of keeping a worker's head above water without effort by the worker, and includes a device that is designed to protect a worker against hypothermia.

(2) Where a worker is required to work at a place from which the worker could fall and drown, and the worker is not protected by a guardrail, an employer or contractor shall:

(a) provide the worker with a life jacket and ensure that the worker uses it, and ensure that the rescue equipment and personnel described in subsection (3) are readily available;

(b) provide the worker with a full-body harness and lifeline and ensure that the worker uses them; or

(c) ensure that a net is installed that is capable of safely catching the worker if the worker falls.

(3) The rescue equipment and personnel required by clause (2)(a) must consist of:

(a) a suitable boat equipped with a boat hook;

(b) a buoyant apparatus attached to a nylon rope that is not less than nine millimetres in diameter and not less than 15 metres long; and

(c) a sufficient number of properly equipped and trained workers to implement rescue procedures.

(4) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a life jacket or personal flotation device is provided for each worker who is transported by boat or works from a boat, and that each worker uses the life jacket or personal flotation device at all times when the worker is in the boat.

Mines Regulations, 2003
R.R.S., c. O-1, r. 2

Part XVII Fire Prevention and Control

Section 355 Fire-fighting equipment

355. (1) An employer or contractor must ensure that there are suitable and adequate portable fire extinguishers and other suitable and adequate fire-fighting equipment:

(a) in the case of an open pit mine:

(i) on each vehicle;

(ii) on every dredge;

(iii) at every belt conveyor drive unit; and

(iv) at any location where a fire may create a hazard to a worker; and

(b) in the case of an underground mine:

(i) at each headframe or other entrance to an underground mine;

(ii) in each hoist room;

(iii) at any surface location where a fire may create a hazard to a worker;

(iv) on each vehicle and at each stationary diesel engine;

(v) at every underground crusher station, electrical installation, pump station, shaft station, belt conveyor drive unit, service garage, fuel station, explosive storage area, flammable liquid storage area and hot work area; and

(vi) at any other area that is designated as a fire hazard area pursuant to section 352.

(2) An employer or contractor must ensure that the fire-fighting equipment required pursuant to subsection (1) is:

(a) conspicuously marked; and

(b) located so that, in the event of a fire, it will be accessible.