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Scaffolding is a common work tool in the construction industry. It adapts to the needs of different tasks, allows workers and their tools and equipment to access heights, and provides superior protection over ladders. Scaffolding also provides a versatile, cost-effective means of completing work in construction. Some important safety considerations include the selection of the appropriate scaffold, careful assembly according to manufacturer specifications, regular inspection, and proper use.  Attention must also be paid to potential overhead hazards, soil conditions and any hazards to workers below.

This document contains information about general regulatory requirements for use, erection, and dismantling of various types of scaffolds.

What is a “scaffold”?

Scaffold means a temporary elevated platform and the platform’s supporting structure that are designed to support workers and hand tools, or workers, equipment and materials.

There are different types of scaffolds, all offering unique advantages. Each time a person is required to use a scaffold to perform work at heights, an assessment of the hazards must be done to determine the most appropriate type of scaffold.  The CSA Standard Z797-09 (R2014) Code of Practice for Access Scaffold section 4.2 sets out considerations for selection of scaffold and planning of work.

Types of scaffolds:

Employers, contractors, owners, suppliers, and workers all have distinct responsibilities respecting the use, erection, demolition, inspection and maintenance of scaffolds and their components.

Employers and contractors must:

Note: Comments marked with * are also valid for owners and comments marked with ** are valid for owners and suppliers.

  • Provide a scaffold or other safe working platform or appropriate ladder; where work cannot be safely done from the ground or from a permanent structure;
  • Ensure that no objects fall from scaffolding work surfaces. To do this, you must:
    • Ensure that wire mesh, or other material equally effective, is installed for suspended scaffold or suspended powered scaffold to a height of at least 900 mm on all sides except the side adjacent to the structure*;
    • Ensure that wire mesh is installed to a height of 2 m on all sides of (a) a tower hoist , (b) a building shaft hoist; and (c) a hoist cage in an excavated shaft*;
    • Provide an equally effective means where it is necessary to hoist or lower materials that do not require equipping the skip or the sides of a cantilever hoist platform*;
    • Install a gate that is kept closed unless it is in use when workers must pass through a safeguard required by section 120*;
  • Provide toeboards at the edge of a temporary scaffold or work platform which it is possible for materials to fall more than three metres*;
  • Never require or allow a worker to use a needle-beam scaffold or a suspended outrigger scaffold as a work platform;
  • Ensure that half-horse, ladderjack and single-pole scaffolds are only used as light-duty scaffolds;
  • Ensure that bracket scaffolds, outrigger scaffolds, suspended scaffolds and suspended powered scaffolds are used only as light-duty scaffolds unless they are designed by a professional engineer, and constructed, erected, used, maintained, and dismantled in accordance with that design;
  • Ensure the following general requirements for scaffolds:
    • Every light-duty scaffold must be designed and constructed to support the prescribed load;
    • Every heavy-duty scaffold must be designed and constructed to support the prescribed load;
    • Every scaffold must be designed, constructed, erected, used, and maintained so as to perform safely any task it is required to perfom;
    • Every scaffold must be designed, constructed, and erected to support or resist prescribed loads;
    • Every scaffold must be erected, maintained, and dismantled by a competent worker;
    • Ensure that a freestanding scaffold is restrained from overturning by guying or other suitable means;
    • Ensure that a scaffold is built from the ground or other surface is:
      • supported by a foundation of sufficient area and strength to ensure stability;
      • set level on a stable sill that is at least 38 x 240 mm and continuous under at least 2 consecutive supports and where an upright could penetrate the sill, a base plate is installed in the upright;
      • supported against lateral movement by adequate, secure bracing;
      • anchored as required;
      • provided with internal stairways or ladders if the scaffold is 9m or higher;
      • checked to ensure that the scaffold is plumb and level after each tier is added.
    • Where a scaffold is fully or partially enclosed, all components and tie-ins must be adequate to support the added load resulting from wind or other adverse weather conditions;
    • Ensure that workers are provided with the maximum working load of the scaffold and any other prescribed information;
    • If a scaffold is more than 6m high, install a gin wheel and hoist arm or other suitable lifting device to hoist materials from the ground;
  • Ensure that a rope or wire that forms an integral part of the scaffold is protected against abrasion or other physical damage and that where damage due to heat or chemicals is possible that a rope made of heat or chemical resistant material is used;
  • Ensure that the specific requirements for scaffold planks and platforms are met;
  • Ensure the specific requirements for the following types of scaffolds are met:
    • Wooden scaffolds and
    • Metal scaffolds
    • Heavy-duty scaffolds and scaffolds used at certain heights
    • Half-horse scaffolds
    • Bracket scaffolds
    • Ladderjack scaffolds
    • Single-pole scaffolds
    • Outrigger scaffolds
    • Suspended scaffolds
    • Suspended powered scaffolds
    • Rolling scaffolds
    • Shinglers' roofing scaffold
  • Ensure that only competent persons maintain and inspect prescribed equipment** ; and that a maintenance and inspection record tag meets prescribed requirements **;
  • Ensure a temporary supporting structure is designed and constructed to withstand safely all intended loads or that may be reasonably anticipated; and ensure other specific requirements for temporary structures;
  • Ensure that a free-standing scaffold is used in the demolition of a buiding shaft, from the inside*;
  • Ensure that no worker works, no material is piled stored or handled, no scaffold is erected or dismantled and no equipment or powered mobile equipment is used or operated within the minimum distance from any exposed energized electrical conductor as required.

In addition to their other duties, owners must:

  • Make readily available to the workers a copy of the prescribed drawings and supplementary information of heavy-duty scaffolds and scaffolds used at certain heights;
  • Ensure the specific requirements for suspended powered scaffolds are met; and

In addition to their other duties, suppliers must also:

  • Use a manufactured scaffold plank if it is used according to the manufacturer’s recommendations and the manufactured scaffold plank is clearly marked  with its maximum working load or the load specifications are readily available at the worksite;
  • Ensure the specific requirements for suspended scaffolds are met;
  • Ensure the specific requirements for suspended powered scaffolds are met;

Workers must:

  • Before starting to work on a suspended powered scaffold, inspect it to ensure that:
    • thrustouts or parapet hooks are secured, and
    • suspension ropes and lifelines are free from damage or abrasion.
  • While working on a suspended powered scaffold,
    • remain on the platform, between suspension ropes at all times;
    • secure all ropes as required;
    • use a full-body harness, connecting linkage, personal fall arrest system and lifeline as per Part VII;
    • ensure that when ascending or descending, the scaffold remains level.
  • Never bridge the distance between suspended powered scaffolds with planks or other means, nor use the lifeline or suspension ropes as a means of access to or exit from the scaffold unless it is an emergency;
  • Comply with the work practices and procedures developed under clause 186(1)(a);
  • Be aware of the maximum working load of the scaffold they are required to work on and any other information, restriction, or condition that is necessary to ensure its safe use.  This information is provided by the employer or contractor;

Occupational Health and Safety Regulations, 1996
S.S., c. O-1.1, Reg 1

Part IX Safeguards, Storage, Warning Signs and Signals

Section 120 Protection from objects falling from scaffolds, etc.

120. (1) Where a suspended scaffold, suspended powered scaffold or load-carrying unit is suspended from or attached to a structure, an employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that wire mesh, or other material equally effective to prevent objects from falling from the working surface, is installed from the working surface to a height of at least 900 millimetres on all sides except the side adjacent to the structure.

(2) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that wire mesh is installed from the working surface of a platform to a height of two metres on all sides of:

(a) a tower hoist as defined in section 199;

(b) a building shaft hoist; and

(c) a hoist cage in an excavated shaft.

(3) Where it is necessary to hoist or lower materials that are of such a nature that the sides of a cantilever hoist platform or skip cannot be equipped as required by subsection (1), an employer, contractor or owner shall provide another equally effective means for the protection of workers against falling materials.

(4) Where it is necessary for workers to pass through a safeguard required by this section, an employer, contractor or owner shall install a gate that is equally effective to prevent objects from falling from the working surface and shall ensure that the gate is kept closed except when the gate is in use.

Section 123 Toeboards

123. (1) An employer, contractor or owner shall provide toeboards at the edge of:

(a) a permanent floor, platform, mezzanine, walkway, ramp, runway or other surface from which it is possible for materials to fall more than 1.2 metres;

(b) a temporary scaffold or work platform from which it is possible for materials to fall more than three metres; and

(c) a pit for a flywheel or pulley.

(2) Subsection (1) does not apply to a loading or unloading area if the employer, contractor or owner has taken other precautions to ensure that materials will not fall from the floor or other horizontal surface.

(3) Where a toeboard is required by these regulations, an employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that the toeboard extends from the floor or other horizontal surface to a height of not less than:

(a) 125 millimetres from the floor or surface; or

(b) 100 millimetres from the floor or surface, in the case of a toeboard that was installed before March 13, 1986.

Part XII Scaffolds, Aerial Devices, Elevating Work Platforms and Temporary Supporting Structures

Section 168 Interpretation

168. In this Part:

(a) "aerial device" means a vehicle-mounted telescoping or articulating unit that is used to position a worker at an elevated worksite, and includes a work basket or bucket, an aerial ladder, an extendable and articulating boom platform, a vertical tower and any combination of those devices;

(b) "base plate" means a device that is attached to the base of a scaffold upright and that is used to distribute the vertical load over a larger area of the sill;

(c) "bearer" means a horizontal scaffold member on which the platform rests and that may be supported by ledgers, and includes transoms and joists;

(d) "brace" means a scaffold member fastened diagonally to the uprights across the vertical faces of the scaffold to provide stability against lateral movement of the scaffold;

(e) "bracket scaffold" means a platform that is supported by two or more triangular brackets projecting out from a structure to which the brackets are securely fastened;

(f) "double-pole scaffold" means a platform that is supported by bearers attached to a double row of braced uprights;

(g) "elevating work platform" means a work platform that can be self-elevated to overhead worksites, and includes an elevating rolling work platform, a self-propelled elevating work platform and a boom-type elevating work platform;

(h) "flyform deck panel" means a temporary supporting structure that:

(i) is used as a modular falsework;

(ii) is intended to be moved; and

(iii) is capable of being moved from floor to floor and re-used during a construction project;

(i) "half-horse scaffold" means a platform that is supported by two or more braced, splayed supports resting in or on the structure;

(j) "heavy-duty scaffold" means a scaffold that is intended to support workers, equipment and stored or stacked materials and that is designed to support the minimum load identified in clause 172(1)(b);

(k) "ladderjack scaffold" means a platform that is supported by brackets attached to ladders;

(l) "ledger" means a horizontal scaffold member extending from upright to upright that may support the bearers, and includes runners, stringers and ribbons;

(m) "light-duty scaffold" means a scaffold that is intended to support workers and materials for current use only, with no storage of other materials except the worker's tools, and that is designed to support the load identified in clause 172(1)(a);

(n) "maximum load" means the maximum actual load that a scaffold is designed to support or resist in use, and includes the working load, the actual weight of all the components of the scaffold, wind, environmental conditions and all other loads that may reasonably be anticipated;

(o) "modular scaffold" means a platform that is supported by uprights with fixed attachment points for standard-sized ledgers, bracing and accessories;

(p) "needle-beam scaffold" means a platform that is supported by parallel horizontal beams suspended by ropes attached to overhead anchors;

(q) "outrigger scaffold" means a platform that is supported by rigid members that are cantilevered out from the structure or vertical supports;

(r) "personnel lifting unit" means a work platform suspended by rigging from a crane or hoist that is used to position a worker at an elevated worksite, and includes a manbasket and work basket;

(s) "rolling scaffold" means a freestanding scaffold that is equipped with castors or wheels at the base of the scaffold;

(t) "scaffold" means a temporary elevated platform and the platform's supporting structure that are designed to support workers and hand tools, or workers, equipment and materials;

(u) "sill" means a wood, concrete or metal footing used to distribute the load from a standard, an upright or a base plate of a scaffold to the ground;

(v) "single-pole scaffold" means a platform that is supported by bearers attached at the outer end to a single row of braced uprights and at the inner end to the structure;

(w) "suspended outrigger scaffold" means a scaffold with a working platform that is suspended by wooden vertical members from rigid horizontal members that are cantilevered out from the structure;

(x) "suspended powered scaffold" means a platform that is suspended from overhead supports by ropes or cables and equipped with winches or pulley blocks so that the scaffold can be moved, and includes a boatswain's chair, work basket, work cage, swingstage or other similar scaffold;

(y) "suspended scaffold" means a platform that is supported by four wire ropes suspended from members that are cantilevered out from the structure;

(z) "temporary supporting structure" means a falsework, form, flyform deck panel, shoring, brace or cable that is used to support a structure temporarily or to stabilize materials or earthworks until the materials or earthworks are self-supporting or the instability is otherwise overcome, and includes metal scaffold components;

(aa) "tube and clamp scaffold" means a platform that is supported by steel or aluminum tubes with wedge or bolt clamp connectors and accessories;

(bb) "tubular frame scaffold" means a platform that is supported by welded tubular frames, cross-braces and accessories;

(cc) "upright" means a vertical scaffold member that transmits the load to the ground, and includes posts, verticals and standards;

(dd) "working load" means the total of the loads from workers, materials, equipment and work processes.

Section 169 Scaffold required

169. Where work cannot be safely done from the ground or from a permanent structure, an employer or contractor shall provide a scaffold or other safe working platform or a ladder that meets the requirements of Part XVI for the use of workers.

Section 170 Prohibition

170. No employer or contractor shall require or permit a worker to use a needle-beam scaffold or a suspended outrigger scaffold as a work platform.

Section 171 Limited use of certain scaffolds

171. (1) An employer or contractor shall ensure that the following types of scaffolds are used only as light-duty scaffolds:

(a) half-horse scaffolds;

(b) ladderjack scaffolds;

(c) single-pole scaffolds.

(2) An employer or contractor shall ensure that the following types of scaffolds are used only as light-duty scaffolds unless the scaffold is designed by a professional engineer and constructed, erected, used, maintained and dismantled in accordance with that design:

(a) bracket scaffolds;

(b) outrigger scaffolds;

(c) suspended scaffolds;

(d) suspended powered scaffolds.

Section 172 General requirements

172. (1) An employer or contractor shall ensure that:

(a) every light-duty scaffold is designed and constructed to support:

(i) a minimum working load of 3.63 kN per lineal metre of platform width applied vertically and uniformly across an independent platform section along an imaginary line drawn perpendicular to the platform edge anywhere along the length of the section; and

(ii) a minimum uniformly distributed working load of 1.20 kN/m2, acting simultaneously with the concentrated load specified in subclause (i); and

(b) every heavy-duty scaffold is designed and constructed to support:

(i) a minimum working load of 3.88 kN per lineal metre of platform width applied vertically and uniformly across an independent platform section along an imaginary line drawn perpendicular to the platform edge anywhere along the length of the section; and

(ii) a minimum uniformly distributed working load of 3.60 kN/m2, acting simultaneously with the concentrated load specified in subclause (i).

(2) An employer or contractor shall ensure that every scaffold is:

(a) designed, constructed, erected, used and maintained so as to perform safely any task that the scaffold is required to perform;

(b) designed, constructed and erected to support or resist:

(i) in the case of a wooden scaffold, at least four times the load that may be imposed on the scaffold;

(ii) in the case of a metal scaffold, at least 2.2 times the load that may be imposed on the scaffold;

(iii) in the case of any components suspending any part of a scaffold supporting workers, at least 10 times the load that may be imposed on those components; and

(iv) four times the maximum load or force to which the scaffold is likely to be subjected without overturning;

(c) erected, maintained and dismantled by a competent worker.

(3) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a freestanding scaffold is restrained from overturning by guying or other suitable means.

(4) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a scaffold that is built from the ground or other surface:

(a) is supported by a foundation that is of sufficient area, stability and strength to ensure the stability of the scaffold;

(b) is set level on a stable sill that is at least 38 x 240 millimetres and continuous under at least two consecutive supports;

(c) where an upright could penetrate the sill, a base plate is installed in the upright;

(d) is supported against lateral movement by adequate, secure bracing;

(e) is anchored:

(i) vertically at not less than four-metre intervals and horizontally at not less than six-metre intervals;

(ii) where designed by a professional engineer, at intervals recommended by a professional engineer; or

(iii) where commercially manufactured, at intervals recommended by the manufacturer;

(f) is provided with internal stairways or ladders if the scaffold is nine metres or more in height; and

(g) is checked to ensure that the scaffold is plumb and level after each tier is added.

(5) Where a scaffold is partially or fully enclosed, an employer or contractor shall ensure that all scaffold components and tie-ins are adequate to support the added load that may be placed on the scaffold as a result of wind or other adverse weather conditions.

(6) An employer or contractor shall ensure that all workers who are required to work on a scaffold are provided with the following information:

(a) the maximum working load of the scaffold;

(b) any other information, restriction or condition that is necessary to ensure the safe use of the scaffold.

(7) Where a scaffold is more than six metres high, an employer or contractor shall install a gin wheel and hoist arm or other suitable lifting device to hoist materials from the ground.

[Sask. Reg. 6/97, s. 8]

Section 173 Ropes in scaffolds

173. (1) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a rope or wire rope that forms an integral part of a scaffold is protected against abrasion or other physical damage.

(2) Where damage to a rope that forms an integral part of a scaffold from heat or chemicals is possible, an employer or contractor shall ensure that rope of heat or chemical resistant material is used.

Section 174 Scaffold planks and platforms

174. (1) An employer or contractor shall ensure that scaffold planks:

(a) are inspected by a competent worker to ensure that the scaffold planks are free of defects before the planks are incorporated in a scaffold;

(b) subject to subsections (2) and (4), are of 38 x 240 millimetre, number 1 structural grade spruce lumber or material of equivalent or greater strength;

(c) are the same thickness as adjoining planks;

(d) are laid tightly side by side with adjoining planks to cover the full width of the platform;

(e) are secured to prevent accidental or inadvertent movement in any direction;

(f) where wooden, do not span more than three metres between vertical supports on a light-duty scaffold or 2.1 metres between vertical supports on a heavy-duty scaffold;

(g) where metal or manufactured laminate, do not have a span between vertical supports greater than the span recommended by the manufacturer; and

(h) do not extend less than 150 millimetres or more than 300 millimetres beyond the bearers.

(2) An employer, contractor or supplier may use a manufactured scaffold plank if the plank is used according to the manufacturer's recommendations and the manufactured scaffold plank is clearly marked with its maximum working load or the load specifications are readily available at the worksite.

(3) Subject to subsection (4), an employer or contractor shall ensure that a scaffold platform:

(a) is at least one-half metre wide in the case of a light-duty scaffold;

(b) is at least one metre wide in the case of a heavy-duty scaffold; and

(c) is level or, where used as a ramp, has a slope at an angle not steeper than five horizontal to one vertical.

(4) A single manufactured extending painter's plank, or a plank that is 51 x 305 millimetre, number 1 structural grade spruce lumber or material of equivalent or greater strength, may be used in a ladderjack scaffold.

Section 175 Wooden scaffolds

175. (1) An employer or contractor shall ensure that the dimensions of members of a light-duty wooden scaffold that is less than six metres in height are not less than the dimensions specified in Table 15 of the Appendix.

(2) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a wooden scaffold is constructed of unpainted number 1 structural grade spruce lumber or material of equivalent or greater strength.

Section 176 Metal scaffolds

176. (1) Where a metal scaffold is used, an employer or contractor shall ensure that the metal scaffold is:

(a) erected, used, maintained and dismantled in accordance with the manufacturer's or professional engineer's specifications and recommendations; and

(b) inspected, by a competent person, prior to use and daily when in use for any damage, deterioration or weakening of the scaffold or the scaffold's components.

(2) If a metal scaffold or a component of a metal scaffold is damaged, deteriorated or weakened so that the strength or stability of the scaffold is affected, an employer or contractor shall ensure that the scaffold is not used until the scaffold or component is repaired or replaced by a competent person in accordance with the manufacturer's or a professional engineer's specifications and recommendations.

(3) Where a metal scaffold is a tube and clamp scaffold, an employer or contractor shall ensure that:

(a) joints in adjacent uprights are staggered and do not occur in the same tier;

(b) joints in uprights are located not more than one-third of a tier away from the connection of a ledger;

(c) ledgers are erected horizontally along the length of the scaffold and coupled to each upright at regular intervals of one tier;

(d) all ledgers are joined to form a continuous length;

(e) individual tube lengths of a ledger are the lesser of:

(i) two or more bays in length; or

(ii) the horizontal length of the scaffold;

(f) tubes of different metals or gauges are not joined together; and

(g) where base plates are required, they are securely installed in the uprights and securely attached to the sills.

(4) Where a metal scaffold is a standard tubular frame scaffold, an employer or contractor shall ensure that:

(a) where base plates, shore heads, extension devices or screwjacks are necessary, they are securely installed and securely attached to the sills and the legs of the frame; and

(b) there are no gaps between the lower end of one frame and the upper end of the frame below on stacked frames.

(5) Where a metal scaffold is a modular scaffold, an employer or contractor shall ensure that:

(a) where extension devices or screwjack bases and base collars are necessary, they are securely installed and securely attached to the sills;

(b) joints in adjacent uprights are staggered and do not occur in the same tier;

(c) there are no gaps between the lower end of one upright and the upper end of the upright below it;

(d) ledgers, bearers and braces are properly secured; and

(e) components from different modular scaffold systems are not used in the same scaffold.

Section 177 Heavy-duty scaffolds, scaffolds used at certain heights

177. (1) This section applies to a scaffold that:

(a) is to be used as a heavy-duty scaffold;

(b) in the case of a wooden scaffold, has a platform at a height that is six metres or more above either ground level or a permanent working surface; or

(c) in the case of a metal scaffold, has a platform at a height that is greater than 15 metres above either ground level or a permanent working surface.

(2) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that a scaffold mentioned in subsection (1) is:

(a) designed by a professional engineer and erected, used, maintained and dismantled in accordance with that design; or

(b) commercially manufactured to meet the requirements of an approved standard and erected, used, maintained and dismantled in accordance with the manufacturer's specifications and recommendations.

(3) While a scaffold mentioned in subsection (1) is being constructed, erected, used, maintained or dismantled, an employer, contractor or owner shall keep at the worksite all drawings and supplementary information regarding the scaffold, including:

(a) the dimensions, specifications, type and grade of all components of the scaffold; and

(b) the maximum load and the maximum working load that the scaffold is designed or manufactured to support.

(4) An employer, contractor or owner shall make readily available to the workers a copy of the drawings and supplementary information mentioned in subsection (3).

Section 178 Half-horse scaffolds

178. (1) An employer or contractor shall ensure that the legs of a half-horse scaffold are not spliced, are less than three metres high and have an angle of repose and an angle of splay that are 15 from the vertical.

(2) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a ladder is used to provide access to and exit from a half-horse scaffold.

Section 179 Bracket scaffolds

179. An employer or contractor shall ensure that the brackets of a bracket scaffold are securely attached to prevent the brackets from dislodging and are not more than three metres apart.

Section 180 Ladderjack scaffolds

180. An employer or contractor shall ensure that:

(a) brackets and ladders used for a ladderjack scaffold are:

(i) designed and constructed to support the anticipated load safely; and

(ii) used according to the manufacturer's specifications and recommendations; and

(b) ladders used for a ladderjack scaffold are not more than three metres apart.

Section 181 Single-pole scaffolds

181. An employer or contractor shall ensure that:

(a) a single-pole scaffold is adequately supported in two directions by a system of diagonal braces that are:

(i) not more than six metres long; and

(ii) connected to the uprights as close to the ledgers as possible; and

(b) every ledger on a single-pole scaffold is supported by a bearer that is of substantial construction and that is securely fastened to the structure.

Section 182 Outrigger scaffolds

182. Where an outrigger scaffold is used, an employer or contractor shall ensure that the scaffold is:

(a) designed by a professional engineer and erected, used, maintained and dismantled in accordance with that design; or

(b) commercially manufactured to meet the requirements of an approved standard and erected, used, maintained and dismantled in accordance with the manufacturer's specifications and recommendations.

Section 183 Suspended scaffolds

183. (1) Where a suspended scaffold is used, an employer, contractor or supplier shall ensure that the scaffold is:

(a) designed by a professional engineer and erected, used, maintained and dismantled in accordance with that design; or

(b) commercially manufactured to meet the requirements of an approved standard and erected, used, maintained and dismantled in accordance with the manufacturer's specifications and recommendations.

(2) An employer or contractor shall ensure that the working parts of the hoisting mechanism of a suspended scaffold are left exposed so that defective parts or irregular working of the mechanism can be easily detected.

(3) An employer or contractor shall ensure that no worker is required or permitted to operate the hoisting mechanism of a suspended scaffold unless the worker is competent and has been designated by the employer or contractor to perform that work.

(4) An employer or contractor shall ensure that all parts of a suspended scaffold are inspected prior to use and daily when in use.

Section 184 Suspended powered scaffolds

184. (1) Where a suspended powered scaffold is used, an employer, contractor, supplier or owner shall ensure that the scaffold and its suspension system is:

(a) designed by a professional engineer and erected, used, maintained and dismantled in accordance with that design; or

(b) commercially manufactured to meet the requirements of an approved standard and erected, used, maintained and dismantled in accordance with the manufacturer's specifications and recommendations.

(2) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that:

(a) where a parapet is part of the support structure of a suspended powered scaffold, the parapet can withstand the force of the load; and

(b) the anchor points for the suspension system are secure and can safely withstand the load.

(3) An employer, contractor, owner or supplier shall ensure that a power unit of a suspended powered scaffold is equipped with positive pressure controls and positive drives for raising and lowering the scaffold.

(4) Where workers are required to use a manually-operated suspended powered scaffold, an employer, contractor, supplier or owner shall ensure that:

(a) the scaffold is equipped with spring-actuated locking pawls;

(b) the hoisting mechanism is locked in a positive drive position by means of a spring-steel locking pin; and

(c) the locking pin is permanently attached to the hoisting mechanism by a light chain.

(5) Where a suspended powered scaffold is used, an employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that:

(a) the suspension rope consists of wire rope that is at least eight millimetres in diameter or meets the specifications recommended by the manufacturer of the scaffold or the professional engineer who designed the scaffold;

(b) either:

(i) the suspension rope is long enough to reach the next working surface below the scaffold;

(ii) the end of the suspension rope is doubled back and held securely by a cable clamp to prevent the hoisting machine from running off the end of the rope; or

(iii) directional limiting devices that prevent travel of the working platform beyond the safe limit of travel are installed; and

(c) all rigging hardware has a safety factor of at least 10.

(6) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that a suspended powered scaffold is equipped with a secondary safety device that will activate if the suspension rope connection or primary hoisting system fails.

(7) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that a lifeline used with a suspended powered scaffold is:

(a) suspended independently from the scaffold; and

(b) securely attached to a fixed anchor point so that the failure of the scaffold will not cause the lifeline to fail.

(8) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that the working platform of a suspended powered scaffold:

(a) is at least 500 millimetres wide and fastened to the stirrups; and

(b) is designed to prevent the scaffold from swinging or swaying away from the structure from which the scaffold is suspended.

(9) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that:

(a) there is no covering or hoarding around or over a suspended powered scaffold; and

(b) two or more suspended powered scaffolds are not linked together by bridging the distance between the scaffolds with planks or any similar form of connection.

(10) Where a suspended powered scaffold is permanently installed on a structure, an employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that a professional engineer has certified that the scaffold, its suspension system and all components and anchor points are safe before the scaffold is used.

Section 185 Tie-in guides

185. (1) On and after July 1, 1997, an owner shall ensure that a new structure that will be serviced by a suspended powered scaffold is constructed with:

(a) fixed anchor points that will safely support the scaffold and lifelines; and

(b) tie-in guides to provide a positive means of engagement between the suspended part of the equipment and the structure during the full vertical or inclined travel of the scaffold on the face of the structure.

(2) The tie-in guides required by clause (1)(b) must meet the requirements of an approved standard.

Section 187 Workers' responsibilities

187. (1) Before starting to work on a suspended powered scaffold, a worker shall inspect the scaffold to ensure that:

(a) the thrustouts or parapet hooks are secured; and

(b) the suspension ropes and lifelines are free from abrasion or other damage.

(2) While working on a suspended powered scaffold, a worker shall:

(a) remain on the platform between the suspension ropes at all times;

(b) secure from fouling all ropes from the scaffold that extend to the ground or a landing;

(c) use a full-body harness, connecting linkage, personal fall arrest system and lifeline that meet the requirements of Part VII.

(d) ensure that, when the scaffold is being moved up or down on a suspension rope, the scaffold is kept level.

(3) A worker shall not:

(a) bridge the distance between a suspended powered scaffold and any other scaffold with planks or by any other means; or

(b) use the lifeline or the suspension ropes as a means of access to or exit from the scaffold except in cases of emergency.

(4) A worker shall comply with the work practices and procedures developed pursuant to clause 186(1)(a).

[Sask. Reg. 67/2007, s. 19]

Section 188 Rolling scaffolds

188. (1) An employer or contractor shall ensure that the height of a rolling scaffold is not more than three times:

(a) the smallest dimension of the scaffold's base; or

(b) where outriggers are provided, the smallest dimension of the scaffold's base, including the extended outriggers.

(2) Where outriggers are provided on a rolling scaffold, an employer or contractor shall ensure that the outriggers are firmly attached to the scaffold uprights to ensure the stability of the scaffold.

(3) An employer or contractor shall ensure that:

(a) each wheel on a rolling scaffold is equipped with a device to securely attach the wheel to the scaffold;

(b) where vertical adjusting devices are required, they are securely attached to the scaffold; and

(c) each rolling scaffold is secured against inadvertent movement while a worker is on the scaffold.

(4) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a scaffold erected on a movable platform is securely fastened to that platform.

(5) An employer or contractor shall not require or permit a worker to remain on a rolling scaffold while the scaffold is being moved unless:

(a) the height of the work platform does not exceed twice the shortest base dimension of the scaffold;

(b) the route to be travelled by the rolling scaffold has been thoroughly examined and found to be free of any condition that could cause the rolling scaffold to tilt or otherwise go out of control; and

(c) a work platform fills the entire area enclosed by the scaffold structure.

Section 189 Shinglers' roofing scaffold

189. (1) Where a shingler's roofing scaffold is used, an employer or contractor shall ensure that:

(a) the scaffold is designed, constructed, installed and maintained to support the loads that may be applied to the scaffold;

(b) the scaffold is provided with effective non-slipping devices; and

(c) the scaffold platform is at least 38 by 140 millimetres.

(2) The employer or contractor shall develop and implement work practices and procedures for the safe use of any shingler's roof scaffold.

Section 193 Maintenance and inspection

193. (1) An employer, contractor, owner or supplier shall ensure that only competent persons maintain and inspect an aerial device, elevating work platform, suspended powered platform, personnel lifting unit or scaffold to which section 177 applies.

(2) An employer, contractor, owner or supplier shall ensure that a maintenance and inspection record tag:

(a) is provided for an aerial device, elevating work platform, suspended powered scaffold, personnel lifting unit or scaffold to which section 177 applies, and is attached to the device, platform, unit or scaffold near the operator's station; and

(b) has the following recorded on it:

(i) the date of the last maintenance;

(ii) the name and signature of the person who performed the maintenance; and

(iii) an indication that the maintenance has been carried out in accordance with the manufacturer's recommendations.

Section 195 Temporary supporting structures

195. (1) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a temporary supporting structure is designed and constructed to withstand safely all loads that the structure is intended, or may reasonably be anticipated, to support.

(2) Without limiting the generality of subsection (1), an employer or contractor shall meet the requirements of subsection (3) where a temporary supporting structure consists of:

(a) shoring that is more than 3.6 metres high; or

(b) members that are connected to one another so that a load applied to any member of the structure may alter the stresses induced in the other members.

(3) An employer or contractor shall ensure that:

(a) a temporary supporting structure mentioned in subsection (2):

(i) is designed by a professional engineer;

(ii) is inspected by a professional engineer after assembly and before use; and

(iii) is certified by a professional engineer to be safe; and

(b) all the drawings and other instructions necessary to construct and use the temporary supporting structure safely are kept at the worksite.

(4) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a scaffold constructed as an integral part of a temporary supporting structure is designed and certified to be safe by a professional engineer.

Part XVI Entrances, Exits and Ladders

Section 252 Ladders

252. (1) An employer, contractor or supplier shall ensure that every ladder is designed, constructed, used and maintained to perform its function safely.

(2) An employer, contractor or supplier shall ensure that:

(a) no wooden ladder or stepladder is painted with any substance other than a transparent coating; and

(b) no ladder is made by fastening cleats across a single rail or post.

Section 253 Portable ladders

253. (1) In this section and section 254, "portable ladder" means any ladder that is not fixed in place, and includes a stepladder.

(2) An employer or contractor shall ensure that:

(a) a portable ladder is equipped with non-slip feet;

(b) a portable ladder is secured against accidental movement during use;

(c) a metal or wire-bound portable ladder is not used where the ladder or a worker handling or using the ladder may come into contact with an exposed energized electrical conductor; and

(d) a portable ladder extends at least one metre above any platform, roof or other landing to which the ladder is used as a means of access.

(3) An employer or contractor shall ensure that each worker who handles or uses a portable ladder is instructed in the requirements of this section.

(4) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a stepladder:

(a) is not more than six metres high when set for use;

(b) has legs that are securely held in position by means of metal braces or an equivalent rigid support; and

(c) when in use, has a front section slope at an angle of one horizontal to six vertical.

(5) An employer or contractor shall ensure that:

(a) an extension ladder is equipped with locks that securely hold the sections of the ladder in the extended position;

(b) where a section of an extension ladder is extended, the section that is extended overlaps another section for at least one metre;

(c) an extension ladder consisting of two sections does not exceed 14.6 metres in length; and

(d) an extension ladder consisting of more than two sections does not exceed 20 metres in length.

(6) An employer or contractor shall ensure that no single portable ladder and no section of an extension ladder exceeds nine metres in length.

Section 254 Use of portable ladders

254. (1) Where a worker uses a portable ladder other than a stepladder, an employer or contractor shall ensure that:

(a) the ladder is placed against the structure so that the slope of the ladder is one horizontal to four vertical;

(b) the worker does not extend any part of the worker's body except for the worker's arms beyond the side rails of the ladder; and

(c) the worker maintains a three-point stance on the ladder at all times.

(2) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a worker does not work from either of the top two rungs or steps of a portable ladder, unless the ladder is a stepladder that has a platform equipped with a suitable handrail.

Section 255 Fixed ladders

255. (1) In this section, "fixed ladder" means a ladder that is fixed to a structure in a vertical position or at an angle that is between vertical and 25 to the vertical, but does not include a ladder used in underground mining operations to which The Mines Regulations apply.

(2) A ladder that is fixed to a structure at an angle of more than 25 to the vertical, or more than one horizontal to two vertical, is deemed to be a stairway and is subject to the requirements of sections 121 and 251.

(3) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that:

(a) the rungs on a fixed ladder are uniformly spaced with centres that are not less than 250 and not more than 300 millimetres apart;

(b) a clearance of at least 150 millimetres is maintained between the rungs on a fixed ladder and the structure to which the ladder is affixed;

(c) a fixed ladder is securely held in place at the top and bottom and at any intermediate points that are necessary to prevent sway;

(d) the side rails of a fixed ladder extend not less than one metre above any platform, roof or other landing on the structure to which the ladder is fixed;

(e) a ladder opening in a platform, roof or other landing does not exceed 750 millimetres by 750 millimetres;

(f) a fixed ladder that is more than six metres high:

(i) is equipped with:

(A) platforms at intervals of not more than six metres or ladder cages, in the case of ladders installed on or before March 11, 1986; or

(B) platforms at intervals of not more than six metres and ladder cages, in the case of ladders installed on or after March 12, 1986; or

(ii) is equipped with a personal fall arrest system that meets the requirements of Part VII.

(g) a fixed ladder in an excavated shaft is installed in a compartment that is separated from the hoist compartment by a substantial partition.

(4) Where a ladder cage is required by these regulations, an employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that:

(a) the ladder cage is constructed of hoops that are not more than 1.8 metres apart, joined by vertical members not more than 300 millimetres apart around the circumference of the hoop;

(b) no point on a hoop of the ladder cage is more than 750 millimetres from the ladder; and

(c) the ladder cage is of sufficient strength and is designed to contain any worker who may lean or fall against a hoop.

(5) In the case of a ladder cage constructed before July 1, 1997, an employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that:

(a) the lowest hoop of the ladder cage is not more than three metres from a platform, landing or the ground; and

(b) the uppermost hoop of the ladder cage is at the level of a platform, landing or roof.

(6) In the case of a ladder cage constructed on or after July 1, 1997, an employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that:

(a) the lowest hoop of the ladder cage is not more than 2.2 metres from a platform, landing or the ground; and

(b) the uppermost hoop of the ladder cage extends at least one metre above the level of a platform, landing or roof.

[Sask. Reg. 67/2007, s. 23]

Part XXVII Demolition Work

Section 384 Demolition procedures

384. In a demolition, an employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that:

(a) dust from the demolition is controlled to the extent that is reasonably practicable;

(b) materials and debris are not allowed to accumulate in any area to the extent that the materials and debris cause overloading of a structure that could result in the collapse of all or part of the structure;

(c) any opening or hole in a floor, roof or other surface on which workers are required or permitted to walk or stand is guarded or covered as required by section 124;

(d) a free-standing scaffold is used in the demolition of a building shaft from the inside;

(e) steel structures are dismantled column length by column length and tier by tier from the top downward; and

(f) no wall or other part of the structure being demolished is left in an unstable condition or in danger of accidental collapse except during the actual demolition of that wall or part of the structure.

Part XXX Additional Protection for Electrical Workers

Section 465 Proximity to exposed energized high voltage electrical conductors

465. (1) In this section:

(a) "applied science technologist" means an applied science technologist who is registered pursuant to The Saskatchewan Applied Science Technologists and Technicians Act and whose registration has not been suspended or cancelled;

(b) "certified technician" means a certified technician who is registered pursuant to The Saskatchewan Applied Science Technologists and Technicians Act and whose registration has not been suspended or cancelled;

(c) "qualified electrical worker" means:

(i) the holder of a journeyperson's certificate in the electrician trade issued pursuant to The Apprenticeship and Trade Certification Act, 1999, and includes an apprentice in the trade while under the supervision of a journeyperson;

(ii) the holder of a journeyperson's certificate in the power lineperson trade issued pursuant to The Apprenticeship and Trade Certification Act, 1999, and includes an apprentice in the trade while under the supervision of a journeyperson; or

(iii) for the purpose of design, calibrating of equipment, inspection, monitoring, testing, and commissioning of equipment in high voltage installations, electrical engineers, applied science technologists or certified technicians who have achieved professional certification within an electrical, electronics, industrial or instrumentation discipline;

(d) "utility tree trimmer" means a person who has successfully completed a course that has been approved for the purposes of this section.

(1.1) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a qualified electrical worker has had approved training in high voltage safety.

(1.2) No qualified electrical worker shall undertake high voltage electrical work unless the worker:

(a) has written proof of approved training in high voltage electrical safety; and

(b) has that written proof of approved training readily accessible at all times while working near energized high voltage electrical conductors.

(2) Except as otherwise provided in this section, an employer or contractor shall ensure that no worker works, no material is piled, stored or handled, no scaffold is erected or dismantled and no equipment or powered mobile equipment is used or operated within the minimum distance from any exposed energized electrical conductor set out in column 1 of Table 22 of the Appendix.

(2.1) Subsection (2) does not apply to a worker who is undertaking a specific one-time activity under the direct supervision of a qualified electrical worker.

(3) An employer or contractor shall ensure that no worker who is at ground potential approaches an exposed energized electrical conductor closer than the minimum distance set out in column 2 of Table 22 of the Appendix.

(4) An employer or contractor shall ensure that only a qualified electrical worker works closer to an exposed energized electrical conductor than the minimum distance set out in column 2 of Table 22 of the Appendix.

(5) Where a qualified electrical worker works closer to an exposed energized electrical conductor than the minimum distance set out in column 2 of Table 22 of the Appendix, an employer or contractor shall ensure that:

(a) the qualified electrical worker:

(i) performs the work in accordance with written instructions for a safe work procedure that have been developed and signed by a competent person who has been appointed by the employer or contractor for that purpose;

(ii) uses equipment that is approved for the intended use of the equipment; and

(iii) uses personal protective equipment that meets the requirements of Part VII; or

(b) the conductor is operating at 25 kilovolts or less and is fitted with rubber and rubber-like insulating barriers that meet the requirements of an approved standard.

(6) An employer or contractor shall ensure that no part of a vehicle is operated on a public road, highway, street, lane or alley within the minimum distance from an exposed energized electrical conductor set out in column 3 of Table 22 of the Appendix and that no part of a vehicle's load comes within the minimum distance.

(7) An employer or contractor shall ensure that no utility tree trimmer works within the minimum distance from an exposed energized electrical conductor set out in:

(a) column 4 of Table 22 of the Appendix for utility tree trimmers using conducting objects exposed to energized parts;

(b) column 5 of Table 22 of the Appendix for utility tree trimmers using rated tools exposed to energized parts;

(c) column 6 of Table 22 of the Appendix for utility tree trimmers using rated insulating booms.

[Sask. Reg. 67/2007, s. 32]

Part XXXIII Repeal, Transitional and Coming into Force

Schedule Table 15 Minimum Dimensions of Members of Light Duty Wooden 1 Scaffolds (Height Less Than 6 Metres)

[Subsection 175(3)]

Table

Dimensions of Members of Half-horse Scaffolds
1 Ledgers 38 x 140 millimetres
2 Legs 38 x 89 millimetres
3 Braces 19 x 140 millimetres
4 Bearers 19 x 140 millimetres
Dimensions of Members of Single-pole Scaffolds
1 Uprights 38 x 89 millimetres
2 Bearers 2 - 19 x 140 millimetres
3 Ledgers 19 x 140 millimetres
4 Braces 19 x 140 millimetres
Dimensions of Members of Double-pole Scaffolds
1 Uprights 38 x 89 millimetres
2 Bearers 2 - 19 x 140 millimetres
3 Ledgers 19 x 140 millimetres
4 Braces 19 x 140 millimetres
Dimensions of Members of Bracket Scaffolds
1 Uprights 38 x 89 millimetres
2 Bearers 38 x 89 millimetres
3 Braces 38 x 89 millimetres
4 Gusset2 19 millimetre plywood

1 Number 1 structural grade spruce lumber or material of equivalent or greater strength.

2 "Gusset" means a brace or angle bracket that is used to stiffen a corner or angular piece of work.